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dc.contributor.authorTullett, William
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-07T09:05:55Z
dc.date.available2018-09-07T09:05:55Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-22
dc.identifier.citationTullett, W. (2015) 'The Macaroni's ‘Ambrosial Essences’: Perfume, Identity and Public Space in Eighteenth-Century England' , Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 38 (2):163 .en
dc.identifier.issn17540194
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1754-0208.12177
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622953
dc.description.abstractThe male antitype of the macaroni and the space of the pleasure gardens in which he reputedly existed have been primarily understood in terms of vision. This article seeks to re‐integrate other senses, particularly olfaction, into our understanding of these subjects. Sounds and smells, of individuals and urban spaces, undermined the idea of the pleasure garden as an enclosed space and the cultivation of the senses it attempted to encourage. The macaroni and his perfumes were an extreme example of this, linking the pleasure garden to the perfumer's shop and disrupting understandings of bodily comportment, masculinity and the proper use of the senses.
dc.description.sponsorshipArts and Humanities Research Councilen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1754-0208.12177en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studiesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectHistoryen
dc.subjectSensesen
dc.subjectCultural historyen
dc.subjectEighteenth centuryen
dc.subjectSmellen
dc.subjectMasculinityen
dc.subjectUrban historyen
dc.titleThe Macaroni's ‘Ambrosial Essences’: Perfume, identity and public space in Eighteenth-Century England.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal for Eighteenth-Century Studiesen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:28:34Z
html.description.abstractThe male antitype of the macaroni and the space of the pleasure gardens in which he reputedly existed have been primarily understood in terms of vision. This article seeks to re‐integrate other senses, particularly olfaction, into our understanding of these subjects. Sounds and smells, of individuals and urban spaces, undermined the idea of the pleasure garden as an enclosed space and the cultivation of the senses it attempted to encourage. The macaroni and his perfumes were an extreme example of this, linking the pleasure garden to the perfumer's shop and disrupting understandings of bodily comportment, masculinity and the proper use of the senses.


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Archived with thanks to Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies
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