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dc.contributor.authorMcCrory, Moy*
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-06T15:28:37Z
dc.date.available2018-09-06T15:28:37Z
dc.date.issued2013-04
dc.identifier.citationMcCrory, M. (2013) 'Primo Levi as storyteller: The uses of fiction, creative non-fiction and the hard to classify in Levi’s narrative of the Holocaust.' Cultural Studies: Short fiction in theory and practice, 3 (1), p. 85.en
dc.identifier.issn20430701
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622951
dc.description.abstractThe varied forms of short prose writing used by Primo Levi in his continued narrative of the Holocaust allows a reconsideration of him as not merely its witness, but also as its storyteller. Taking The Periodic Table ([1975] 1986) as a conscious shift in Levi’s writing direction this article examines where the fictional developments and memory collide, and attempts to assess if this produces a more memorable format in order to reveal a difficult history. Do we continue to read Levi because his honesty is greater than the bare facts, and is there such a thing as a Holocaust aesthetic?
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIntellecten
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Article,id=16519/en
dc.subjectStorytellingen
dc.subjectNarrationen
dc.subjectShort storyen
dc.subjectFictionen
dc.subjectHolocaust literatureen
dc.titlePrimo Levi as storyteller: The uses of fiction, creative non-fiction and the hard to classify in Levi’s narrative of the Holocaust.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2043071X
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalCultural Studies: Short Fiction in Theory & Practiceen
html.description.abstractThe varied forms of short prose writing used by Primo Levi in his continued narrative of the Holocaust allows a reconsideration of him as not merely its witness, but also as its storyteller. Taking The Periodic Table ([1975] 1986) as a conscious shift in Levi’s writing direction this article examines where the fictional developments and memory collide, and attempts to assess if this produces a more memorable format in order to reveal a difficult history. Do we continue to read Levi because his honesty is greater than the bare facts, and is there such a thing as a Holocaust aesthetic?


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