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dc.contributor.authorBird, Drew
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-30T15:27:26Z
dc.date.available2018-08-30T15:27:26Z
dc.date.issued2010-09-11
dc.identifier.citationThen there were three - 'The show must go on'. by Drew Bird (2010) Directed by Drew Bird [BADth Annual Conference, 11th September].en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622933
dc.description.abstractThis Theatrical show will develop ideas of Peter Brook's empty space and Lecoq's neutral space and how this utilizes the imagination. The content will be an exploration of loss, isolation and the struggle to adapt to change and the utilization of the imagination to explore somatic memory. The show will explore the memories of the body which conflict with the memories of the mind. The drama will present a show struggling to continue and how this impacts on the diminishing cast who are axed one by one as the play his financial crises. The show has been running many years and the attracted large audiences in the past and yet still continues to try and capture the glory days. The show explores the characters' struggle to reconcile the changes in the show and their difficulty responding to the changes, still replaying out the same scenes with an imaginary cast. The show develops the ideas of Psychiatrist and Hypnotherapist Milton Erikson who said there are no resistant clients just inflexible therapists. This is a development of the Buddhist idea of a fixed self and how such a narrative can impact on the ability to navigate the necessary challenges through the journey of life and as a therapist. Themes include existentialism, Jung's individuation process, rites of passage, improvisation and the development of the self and dramatherapists need to be flexible in order to attune to change and the needs of the clients. The show locates the importance of theater at the heart of the transformation process and how working with the physical body can access Stanislavsky's ideas of emotional memory and access the unconscious. The show will demonstrate the power of Brectian approaches to theater and the role the audience plays in the show as part of the shared transformation of change.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Association of Dramatherapists Annual Conferenceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://badth.org.uk/en
dc.relation.urlen
dc.subjectEmotional memoryen
dc.subjectClient-centreden
dc.subjectFlexible therapistsen
dc.subjectSolo performanceen
dc.subjectFixed narrativesen
dc.subjectClient attunmenten
dc.subjectTherapist developmenten
dc.subjectTransformationen
dc.subjectTheatreen
dc.subjectPerformanceen
dc.titleThen there were three - 'The show must go on'.en
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:27:45Z
html.description.abstractThis Theatrical show will develop ideas of Peter Brook's empty space and Lecoq's neutral space and how this utilizes the imagination. The content will be an exploration of loss, isolation and the struggle to adapt to change and the utilization of the imagination to explore somatic memory. The show will explore the memories of the body which conflict with the memories of the mind. The drama will present a show struggling to continue and how this impacts on the diminishing cast who are axed one by one as the play his financial crises. The show has been running many years and the attracted large audiences in the past and yet still continues to try and capture the glory days. The show explores the characters' struggle to reconcile the changes in the show and their difficulty responding to the changes, still replaying out the same scenes with an imaginary cast. The show develops the ideas of Psychiatrist and Hypnotherapist Milton Erikson who said there are no resistant clients just inflexible therapists. This is a development of the Buddhist idea of a fixed self and how such a narrative can impact on the ability to navigate the necessary challenges through the journey of life and as a therapist. Themes include existentialism, Jung's individuation process, rites of passage, improvisation and the development of the self and dramatherapists need to be flexible in order to attune to change and the needs of the clients. The show locates the importance of theater at the heart of the transformation process and how working with the physical body can access Stanislavsky's ideas of emotional memory and access the unconscious. The show will demonstrate the power of Brectian approaches to theater and the role the audience plays in the show as part of the shared transformation of change.


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