Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHall, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T13:58:26Z
dc.date.available2018-08-15T13:58:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.identifier.citationHall, M. (2018) 'The light ages: An investigation into the relationship between photography and the hegemony of light.' University of Derby [PhD Thesis]en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622897
dc.description.abstractThis study sets out to establish an hegemony of light and examine its relationship to the lens in photography. Through a series of sequenced photographs presented as an exhibition The Light Ages in May 2017. The photographs were 841mm x 1189 mm Giclee prints mounted on aluminum which explore the way in which difference sources of light contribute to the identity of different spaces by fracturing and separating the light and duration of the image. The thesis explores how light permeates the English language and is inscribed in terms used to define photography. As a source of energy, light provides the very essence of visibility and defines the perception of objectivity and its limits. The geometric relationship between the light axes and the lens axis is what forms the basis of my development of Gramsci’s concept of hegemony. Since all photographs rely on some kind of light it was important to identify one that was developed specifically for photographic use and controlled almost exclusively by the agents of photographic representation. It also appears to mark the ontology of the image, however, as this study examines it is only one of the temporal registers. The practice seeks to tear apart these temporal registers to show the dualism and hegemony of light, how it attempts to pin down one interpretation at the expense of another. One of the greatest challenges for researchers, is to consider new photographic discourses that attempt to understand how advances in technology affect the relationship between the aesthetic and the signified. Through practice, the study tests and explores the relationship between flash light and the lens axis. It questions whether our perception of the centrality of photographic representation is the defining characteristic of photography as a stable form of representation in contemporary culture.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPhotographyen
dc.subjectLighten
dc.subjectDeleuzeen
dc.subjectDerridaen
dc.subjectHegemonyen
dc.subjectFoucaulten
dc.titleThe light ages: An investigation into the relationship between photography and the hegemony of light.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteOkay to approve, required redactions made - Carolineen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:22:37Z
html.description.abstractThis study sets out to establish an hegemony of light and examine its relationship to the lens in photography. Through a series of sequenced photographs presented as an exhibition The Light Ages in May 2017. The photographs were 841mm x 1189 mm Giclee prints mounted on aluminum which explore the way in which difference sources of light contribute to the identity of different spaces by fracturing and separating the light and duration of the image. The thesis explores how light permeates the English language and is inscribed in terms used to define photography. As a source of energy, light provides the very essence of visibility and defines the perception of objectivity and its limits. The geometric relationship between the light axes and the lens axis is what forms the basis of my development of Gramsci’s concept of hegemony. Since all photographs rely on some kind of light it was important to identify one that was developed specifically for photographic use and controlled almost exclusively by the agents of photographic representation. It also appears to mark the ontology of the image, however, as this study examines it is only one of the temporal registers. The practice seeks to tear apart these temporal registers to show the dualism and hegemony of light, how it attempts to pin down one interpretation at the expense of another. One of the greatest challenges for researchers, is to consider new photographic discourses that attempt to understand how advances in technology affect the relationship between the aesthetic and the signified. Through practice, the study tests and explores the relationship between flash light and the lens axis. It questions whether our perception of the centrality of photographic representation is the defining characteristic of photography as a stable form of representation in contemporary culture.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
The Light Ages Complete 2018 ...
Size:
35.31Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final redacted thesis

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record