Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorBhundia, Rakhee
dc.contributor.authorMitra, Ranjana
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorIrons, Christopher Paul
dc.contributor.authorSanghera, Jasvinder
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T14:57:05Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T14:57:05Z
dc.date.issued2007-02-14
dc.identifier.citationGilbert, P. et al (2007) 'Cultural differences in shame-focused attitudes towards mental health problems in Asian and Non-Asian student women.', Mental Health Religion & Culture, 10(2), pp. 127-141.en
dc.identifier.issn13674676
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13694670500415124
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622864
dc.description.abstractThis study explored differences in shame-focused attitudes to mental health problems in Asian and non-Asian students. The ‘Attitudes Towards Mental Health Problems’ (ATMHP) is a self-report scale designed for this study to measure: external shame (beliefs that others will look down on self if one has mental health problems); internal shame (related to negative self-evaluations); and reflected shame (believing that one can bring shame to family/community). A second questionnaire was designed to measure concerns with confidentiality. Results suggest that Asian students have higher external shame and reflected shame, but not internal shame beliefs. Asian students were also more concerned with confidentiality when it comes to talking about personal feeling/anxieties.
dc.description.sponsorshipMental Health Research Unit Department of Healthen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13694670500415124en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCultural differenceen
dc.subjectShameen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.titleCultural differences in shame-focused attitudes towards mental health problems in Asian and Non-Asian student women.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14699737
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentKingsway Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalMental Health Religion & Cultureen
html.description.abstractThis study explored differences in shame-focused attitudes to mental health problems in Asian and non-Asian students. The ‘Attitudes Towards Mental Health Problems’ (ATMHP) is a self-report scale designed for this study to measure: external shame (beliefs that others will look down on self if one has mental health problems); internal shame (related to negative self-evaluations); and reflected shame (believing that one can bring shame to family/community). A second questionnaire was designed to measure concerns with confidentiality. Results suggest that Asian students have higher external shame and reflected shame, but not internal shame beliefs. Asian students were also more concerned with confidentiality when it comes to talking about personal feeling/anxieties.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/