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dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorMitra, Ranjana
dc.contributor.authorFranks, Leigh
dc.contributor.authorRichter, Anne
dc.contributor.authorRockliff, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T14:27:28Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T14:27:28Z
dc.date.issued2008-06-17
dc.identifier.citationGilbert, P. et al (2008) 'Feeling safe and content: A specific affect regulation system? Relationship to depression, anxiety, stress, and self-criticism', The Journal of Positive Psychology, 3 (3):182 .en
dc.identifier.issn17439760
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17439760801999461
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622860
dc.description.abstractRecent work in the neuroscience of positive affect has suggested that there may be two different types of positive affect. One is linked to a drive/seeking system (and may be dopaminergic mediated) and the other is a soothing-contentment system (and may be opiate/oxytocin mediated). This study sought to develop a self-report scale that could tap these positive affects in regard to characteristic feelings individuals may have. Results from 203 students suggested three (rather than two) underlying factors: activated positive affect, relaxed positive affect, and safe/content positive affect. It was the safe/content positive affect that had the highest negative correlations with depression, anxiety and stress, self-criticism, and insecure attachment. Hence, greater clarity on the different types and functions of positive affect may demystify the relationship between positive emotions and well-being.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17439760801999461en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of Positive Psychologyen
dc.subjectAttachmenten
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectPositive affecten
dc.subjectSelf-criticismen
dc.titleFeeling safe and content: A specific affect regulation system? Relationship to depression, anxiety, stress, and self-criticism.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn17439779
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentKingsway Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Positive Psychologyen
html.description.abstractRecent work in the neuroscience of positive affect has suggested that there may be two different types of positive affect. One is linked to a drive/seeking system (and may be dopaminergic mediated) and the other is a soothing-contentment system (and may be opiate/oxytocin mediated). This study sought to develop a self-report scale that could tap these positive affects in regard to characteristic feelings individuals may have. Results from 203 students suggested three (rather than two) underlying factors: activated positive affect, relaxed positive affect, and safe/content positive affect. It was the safe/content positive affect that had the highest negative correlations with depression, anxiety and stress, self-criticism, and insecure attachment. Hence, greater clarity on the different types and functions of positive affect may demystify the relationship between positive emotions and well-being.


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