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dc.contributor.authorCruddas, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan, Kirsten
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T09:23:03Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T09:23:03Z
dc.date.issued2012-03
dc.identifier.citationCruddas, S. et al (2012) 'The relationship between self-concealment and disclosure, early experiences, attachement, and social comparison.', International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 28-37.en
dc.identifier.issn19371209
dc.identifier.doi10.1521/ijct.2012.5.1.28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622852
dc.description.abstractTalking therapies rely on the client being able to reveal their inner feelings and thoughts; however, some people find this type of disclosure very difficult. Given the potential therapeutic disruptive effects of problems in self-disclosure and selfconcealment, this study set out to explore the associations between self-concealment, self-disclosure, early life experiences, attachment style, social comparison, and psychopathology in 92 students. Results show that self-concealment and fear of self-disclosure are related to negative social comparison (feeling inferior), depression, and anxiety. Fear of disclosure is more strongly related to depression, anxiety, and stress than self-concealment. Mediator analysis revealed recalling having to act submissively in childhood is associated with insecure adult attachment and this in turn predicts fear of disclosure. A second mediator analysis revealed that insecure adult attachment is associated with fear of disclosure and this in turn predicts depression.
dc.description.sponsorshipMental Health Research Uniten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGuildford Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://guilfordjournals.com/doi/10.1521/ijct.2012.5.1.28en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectSelf concealmenten
dc.subjectChildhooden
dc.subjectSocial comparisonen
dc.subjectAttachmenten
dc.subjectPsychopathologyen
dc.titleThe relationship between self-concealment and disclosure, early experiences, attachement, and social comparison.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentKingsway Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Cognitive Therapyen
html.description.abstractTalking therapies rely on the client being able to reveal their inner feelings and thoughts; however, some people find this type of disclosure very difficult. Given the potential therapeutic disruptive effects of problems in self-disclosure and selfconcealment, this study set out to explore the associations between self-concealment, self-disclosure, early life experiences, attachment style, social comparison, and psychopathology in 92 students. Results show that self-concealment and fear of self-disclosure are related to negative social comparison (feeling inferior), depression, and anxiety. Fear of disclosure is more strongly related to depression, anxiety, and stress than self-concealment. Mediator analysis revealed recalling having to act submissively in childhood is associated with insecure adult attachment and this in turn predicts fear of disclosure. A second mediator analysis revealed that insecure adult attachment is associated with fear of disclosure and this in turn predicts depression.


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