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dc.contributor.authorKillingley, Jo
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Sue E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-06T11:43:18Z
dc.date.available2018-07-06T11:43:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-02
dc.identifier.citationKillingley, Jo and Dyson, Sue E. (2016) Student midwives perspectives on the efficacy of feedback after objective structured clinical examination. British Journal of Midwifery, 24 (5). pp. 362-368.en
dc.identifier.issn0969-4900
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/bjom.2016.24.5.362
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622787
dc.description.abstractStudents' experience of feedback is considered an indicator of the efficacy of the assessment process. Negative experiences of feedback are unproductive in terms of the likelihood that students will act upon and learn from assessment. To understand the impact of feedback on learning this study explored the experiences of student midwives after receiving feedback following Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Data were collected from second year undergraduate student midwives who had recently completed OSCE, via a focus group. Students reported raised stress levels, concerns around legitimacy of feedback, and inconsistencies in the manner in which feedback was articulated. Assessment feedback in higher education should be used to empower students to become self-regulated learners. This is important for student midwives for whom a considerable amount of leaning is spent in practice. The study has implications for midwifery academics concerned with modes of assessment and quality of assessment feedback in midwifery education.
dc.relation.urlhttp://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/19436/
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.12968/bjom.2016.24.5.362
dc.titleStudent midwives perspectives on the efficacy of feedback after objective structured clinical examination.
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Midwiferyen
dc.publisher.placeMA Healthcare
html.description.abstractStudents' experience of feedback is considered an indicator of the efficacy of the assessment process. Negative experiences of feedback are unproductive in terms of the likelihood that students will act upon and learn from assessment. To understand the impact of feedback on learning this study explored the experiences of student midwives after receiving feedback following Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Data were collected from second year undergraduate student midwives who had recently completed OSCE, via a focus group. Students reported raised stress levels, concerns around legitimacy of feedback, and inconsistencies in the manner in which feedback was articulated. Assessment feedback in higher education should be used to empower students to become self-regulated learners. This is important for student midwives for whom a considerable amount of leaning is spent in practice. The study has implications for midwifery academics concerned with modes of assessment and quality of assessment feedback in midwifery education.


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