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dc.contributor.authorVan Gordon, William
dc.contributor.authorShonin, Edo
dc.contributor.authorDiouri, Sofiane
dc.contributor.authorGarcia-Campayo, Javier
dc.contributor.authorKotera, Yasuhiro
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Mark D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-27T08:50:38Z
dc.date.available2018-06-27T08:50:38Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-07
dc.identifier.citationVan Gordon, W. et al (2018) 'Ontological addiction theory: Attachment to me, mine, and I', Journal of Behavioral Addictions, DOI: 10.1556/2006.7.2018.45en
dc.identifier.issn20625871
dc.identifier.doi10.1556/2006.7.2018.45
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622772
dc.description.abstractBackground: Ontological addiction theory (OAT) is a novel metaphysical model of psychopathology and posits that human beings are prone to forming implausible beliefs concerning the way they think they exist, and that these beliefs can become addictive leading to functional impairments and mental illness. The theoretical underpinnings of OAT derive from the Buddhist philosophical perspective that all phenomena, including the self, do not manifest inherently or independently. Aims and methods: This paper outlines the theoretical foundations of OAT along with indicative supportive empirical evidence from studies evaluating meditation awareness training as well as studies investigating non-attachment, emptiness, compassion, and loving-kindness. Results: OAT provides a novel perspective on addiction, the factors that underlie mental illness, and how beliefs concerning selfhood are shaped and reified. Conclusion: In addition to continuing to test the underlying assumptions of OAT, future empirical research needs to determine how ontological addiction fits with extant theories of self, reality, and suffering, as well with more established models of addiction.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAkadémiai Kiadóen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.akademiai.com/doi/10.1556/2006.7.2018.45en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Behavioral Addictionsen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectOntological addiction theoryen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectMeditationen
dc.subjectPsychopathologyen
dc.titleOntological addiction theory: Attachment to me, mine, and I.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn20635303
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Behavioral Addictionsen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Psychological Research, University of Derby, Derby, UK
dc.contributor.institutionAwake to Wisdom Centre for Meditation and Mindfulness Research, Ragusa, Italy
dc.contributor.institutionAwake to Wisdom Centre for Meditation and Mindfulness Research, Ragusa, Italy
dc.contributor.institutionMiguel Servet University Hospital, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Psychological Research, University of Derby, Derby, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottinghamshire, UK
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:14:03Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Ontological addiction theory (OAT) is a novel metaphysical model of psychopathology and posits that human beings are prone to forming implausible beliefs concerning the way they think they exist, and that these beliefs can become addictive leading to functional impairments and mental illness. The theoretical underpinnings of OAT derive from the Buddhist philosophical perspective that all phenomena, including the self, do not manifest inherently or independently. Aims and methods: This paper outlines the theoretical foundations of OAT along with indicative supportive empirical evidence from studies evaluating meditation awareness training as well as studies investigating non-attachment, emptiness, compassion, and loving-kindness. Results: OAT provides a novel perspective on addiction, the factors that underlie mental illness, and how beliefs concerning selfhood are shaped and reified. Conclusion: In addition to continuing to test the underlying assumptions of OAT, future empirical research needs to determine how ontological addiction fits with extant theories of self, reality, and suffering, as well with more established models of addiction.


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Archived with thanks to Journal of Behavioral Addictions
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