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dc.contributor.authorIrons, J. Yoon
dc.contributor.authorPetocz, Peter
dc.contributor.authorKenny, Dianna Theadora
dc.contributor.authorChang, Anne B.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-15T15:08:43Z
dc.date.available2018-06-15T15:08:43Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-15
dc.identifier.citationIrons, J. Y. et al (2016) 'Singing as an adjunct therapy for children and adults with cystic fibrosis', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008036.pub4en
dc.identifier.issn14651858
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/14651858.CD008036.pub4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622760
dc.description.abstractPeople with cystic fibrosis are at risk of chest infections due to abnormally thick mucus in their airways. Airway clearance is therefore an important part of managing the condition. Increasing anecdotal reports suggest that singing may support lung function and enhance quality of life in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched for trials using the standard search methods of the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group, and conducted extensive searches in other relevant databases and publications. This is an update of a previously published review.Participants from both the singing and recreation groups reported some improvement in quality of life measurements. Participants in the singing group demonstrated a greater increase in maximal expiratory pressure (a substitute measure of respiratory muscle strength test), while participants in the recreation group did not show improvement. No adverse events were reported. There is currently not enough evidence to assess the effect of singing on clinical outcomes in people with cystic fibrosis. Future studies using robust methods are needed to assess the possible effects of singing for people with cystic fibrosis
dc.description.sponsorshipNoneen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCochrane Libraryen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/14651858.CD008036.pub4en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviewsen
dc.subjectSingingen
dc.subjectCystic fibrosisen
dc.titleSinging as an adjunct therapy for children and adults with cystic fibrosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGriffith Universityen
dc.identifier.journalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviewsen
dc.contributor.institutionSouth Bank Campus, Griffith University; Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre; 140 Grey Street Brisbane Australia QLD 4101
dc.contributor.institutionMacquarie University; Department of Statistics; Eastern Road Sydney NSW Australia 2109
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Sydney; Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health, Faculty of Health Sciences; East St Lidcombe NSW Australia 1825
dc.contributor.institutionMenzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University; Child Health Division; PO Box 41096 Darwin Northern Territories Australia 0811
html.description.abstractPeople with cystic fibrosis are at risk of chest infections due to abnormally thick mucus in their airways. Airway clearance is therefore an important part of managing the condition. Increasing anecdotal reports suggest that singing may support lung function and enhance quality of life in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched for trials using the standard search methods of the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group, and conducted extensive searches in other relevant databases and publications. This is an update of a previously published review.Participants from both the singing and recreation groups reported some improvement in quality of life measurements. Participants in the singing group demonstrated a greater increase in maximal expiratory pressure (a substitute measure of respiratory muscle strength test), while participants in the recreation group did not show improvement. No adverse events were reported. There is currently not enough evidence to assess the effect of singing on clinical outcomes in people with cystic fibrosis. Future studies using robust methods are needed to assess the possible effects of singing for people with cystic fibrosis


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