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dc.contributor.authorHanel, Paul H. P.
dc.contributor.authorMaio, Gregory R.
dc.contributor.authorSoares, Ana K. S.
dc.contributor.authorVione, Katia C.
dc.contributor.authorde Holanda Coelho, Gabriel L.
dc.contributor.authorGouveia, Valdiney V.
dc.contributor.authorPatil, Appasaheb C.
dc.contributor.authorKamble, Shanmukh V.
dc.contributor.authorManstead, Antony S. R.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-04T15:37:21Z
dc.date.available2018-06-04T15:37:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-29
dc.identifier.citationHanel, P. H. P. et al (2018) 'Cross-Cultural Differences and Similarities in Human Value Instantiation', Frontiers in Psychology, 9:849. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00849en
dc.identifier.issn16641078
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00849
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622749
dc.description.abstractPrevious research found that the within-country variability of human values (e.g., equality and helpfulness) clearly outweighs between-country variability. Across three countries (Brazil, India, and the United Kingdom), the present research tested in student samples whether between-nation differences reside more in the behaviors used to concretely instantiate (i.e., exemplify or understand) values than in their importance as abstract ideals. In Study 1 (N = 630), we found several meaningful between-country differences in the behaviors that were used to concretely instantiate values, alongside high within-country variability. In Study 2 (N = 677), we found that participants were able to match instantiations back to the values from which they were derived, even if the behavior instantiations were spontaneously produced only by participants from another country or were created by us. Together, these results support the hypothesis that people in different nations can differ in the behaviors that are seen as typical as instantiations of values, while holding similar ideas about the abstract meaning of the values and their importance.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge financial support by the School of Psychology, Cardiff University (psych.cf.ac.uk), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC; www.esrc.ac.uk) to the first author (ES/J500197/1), and the CAPES Foundation (Brazil, http://www.capes.gov.br/) to the fourth and fifth author. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiersen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00849/fullen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Frontiers in Psychologyen
dc.subjectHuman valuesen
dc.subjectBehaviouren
dc.subjectInstantiationen
dc.subjectCross culturalen
dc.subjectValue-behaviour relationsen
dc.titleCross-cultural differences and similarities in human value instantiation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCardiff Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bathen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sulen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidade Federal da Paraíbaen
dc.contributor.departmentKarnatak Universityen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:12:08Z
html.description.abstractPrevious research found that the within-country variability of human values (e.g., equality and helpfulness) clearly outweighs between-country variability. Across three countries (Brazil, India, and the United Kingdom), the present research tested in student samples whether between-nation differences reside more in the behaviors used to concretely instantiate (i.e., exemplify or understand) values than in their importance as abstract ideals. In Study 1 (N = 630), we found several meaningful between-country differences in the behaviors that were used to concretely instantiate values, alongside high within-country variability. In Study 2 (N = 677), we found that participants were able to match instantiations back to the values from which they were derived, even if the behavior instantiations were spontaneously produced only by participants from another country or were created by us. Together, these results support the hypothesis that people in different nations can differ in the behaviors that are seen as typical as instantiations of values, while holding similar ideas about the abstract meaning of the values and their importance.


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