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dc.contributor.authorIgnatans, Dainis
dc.contributor.authorPease, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-29T10:18:07Z
dc.date.available2018-03-29T10:18:07Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationIgnatans, D. and Pease, K. (2015) 'Distributive justice and the crime drop.' in Martin A. Andresen and Graham Farrell (eds.) 'The Criminal Act', London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 77-87.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781349482917
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/9781137391322_6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622469
dc.description.abstractData were extracted from a total of almost 600000 respondents from all sweeps of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) 1982-2012 to determine whether victimisation was more or less concentrated across households during the crime drop. The most victimised household decile experienced the greatest absolute decline in victimisation but still accounted for over 70% of all victimisations suffered. Methodological issues underlying the patterns observed are discussed. The characteristics associated with highly victimised household are consistent across survey sweeps. Cross-national and crime type extension of work of the kind undertaken is advocated as both intrinsically important and likely to clarify the dynamics of the crime drop.
dc.description.sponsorshipNoneen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1057/9781137391322_6en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCrime dropen
dc.subjectDistrinutive justiceen
dc.subjectCriminologyen
dc.subjectVictimisationen
dc.titleDistributive justice and the crime drop.en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Kenten
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Londonen
refterms.dateFOA2019-01-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractData were extracted from a total of almost 600000 respondents from all sweeps of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) 1982-2012 to determine whether victimisation was more or less concentrated across households during the crime drop. The most victimised household decile experienced the greatest absolute decline in victimisation but still accounted for over 70% of all victimisations suffered. Methodological issues underlying the patterns observed are discussed. The characteristics associated with highly victimised household are consistent across survey sweeps. Cross-national and crime type extension of work of the kind undertaken is advocated as both intrinsically important and likely to clarify the dynamics of the crime drop.


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