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dc.contributor.authorThreapleton, Kate
dc.contributor.authorNewberry, Karen
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Greg
dc.contributor.authorWorthington, Esme
dc.contributor.authorDrummond, Avril
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-22T12:31:09Z
dc.date.available2018-03-22T12:31:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-09
dc.identifier.citationThreapleton, K., et al (2018) 'Virtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke.', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, DOI: 10.1177/0308022617743459en
dc.identifier.issn03080226
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0308022617743459
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622428
dc.description.abstractVirtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke Show less Kate Threapleton, Karen Newberry, Greg Sutton, Esme Worthington, Avril Drummond First Published January 9, 2018 Research Article Download PDFPDF download for Virtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke Article information Full Access Article Information Article first published online: January 9, 2018 Received: January 27, 2017; Accepted: October 19, 2017 https://doi.org/10.1177/0308022617743459 Kate Threapleton1, Karen Newberry2, Greg Sutton3, Esme Worthington1, Avril Drummond4 1Research Fellow, 14278School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK 2Senior Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, UK 3Learning Technology Developer, Learning Enhancement, University of Derby, UK 4Professor of Healthcare Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK Corresponding Author: Kate Threapleton, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, A Floor, South Block Link, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2HA, UK. Email: kate.threapleton@nottingham.ac.uk Abstract Introduction Virtual reality has the potential to assist occupational therapists in preparing patients for discharge by facilitating discussions and providing education about relevant practical issues and safety concerns. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of using a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke and pilot its use. Method Practical aspects of delivering a virtual reality intervention prior to discharge were explored by means of a non-randomised feasibility study and a subsequent pilot randomised controlled trial. Factors considered included eligibility, recruitment, intervention delivery, attrition and suitability of outcome measures. Outcome measures included standardised assessments of stroke severity, mobility, health-related quality of life, functional ability, satisfaction with services and concerns about falling. Results Thirty-three participants were recruited in total: 17 to the feasibility study and 16 to the pilot trial. At 1-month follow-up, 14 participants (82%) were re-assessed in the feasibility study and 12 (75%) in the pilot trial. The main difficulties encountered related to recruitment, particularly regarding post-stroke cognitive impairments, the presence of mild deficits or illness. Conclusion It was feasible to recruit and retain participants, deliver the intervention and collect outcome measures, despite slow recruitment rates. These findings could inform the design of a definitive trial. Keywords
dc.description.sponsorshipStroke associationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0308022617743459en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Occupational Therapyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectVirtual realityen
dc.subjectHome visitsen
dc.subjectStrokeen
dc.subjectRehabilitationen
dc.subjectOccupational therapyen
dc.titleVirtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14776006
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapyen
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-19
html.description.abstractVirtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke Show less Kate Threapleton, Karen Newberry, Greg Sutton, Esme Worthington, Avril Drummond First Published January 9, 2018 Research Article Download PDFPDF download for Virtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke Article information Full Access Article Information Article first published online: January 9, 2018 Received: January 27, 2017; Accepted: October 19, 2017 https://doi.org/10.1177/0308022617743459 Kate Threapleton1, Karen Newberry2, Greg Sutton3, Esme Worthington1, Avril Drummond4 1Research Fellow, 14278School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK 2Senior Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, UK 3Learning Technology Developer, Learning Enhancement, University of Derby, UK 4Professor of Healthcare Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK Corresponding Author: Kate Threapleton, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, A Floor, South Block Link, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2HA, UK. Email: kate.threapleton@nottingham.ac.uk Abstract Introduction Virtual reality has the potential to assist occupational therapists in preparing patients for discharge by facilitating discussions and providing education about relevant practical issues and safety concerns. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of using a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke and pilot its use. Method Practical aspects of delivering a virtual reality intervention prior to discharge were explored by means of a non-randomised feasibility study and a subsequent pilot randomised controlled trial. Factors considered included eligibility, recruitment, intervention delivery, attrition and suitability of outcome measures. Outcome measures included standardised assessments of stroke severity, mobility, health-related quality of life, functional ability, satisfaction with services and concerns about falling. Results Thirty-three participants were recruited in total: 17 to the feasibility study and 16 to the pilot trial. At 1-month follow-up, 14 participants (82%) were re-assessed in the feasibility study and 12 (75%) in the pilot trial. The main difficulties encountered related to recruitment, particularly regarding post-stroke cognitive impairments, the presence of mild deficits or illness. Conclusion It was feasible to recruit and retain participants, deliver the intervention and collect outcome measures, despite slow recruitment rates. These findings could inform the design of a definitive trial. Keywords


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