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dc.contributor.authorMcCaig Colin
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Anna
dc.contributor.authorBowers-Brown, Tamsin
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T14:25:41Z
dc.date.available2018-03-19T14:25:41Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationMCCAIG, Colin, STEVENS, Anna and BOWERS-BROWN, Tamsin(2006). 'Does Aimhigher work? evidence from the national evaluation.' Presented at Higher Education Research Network, Sheffield, 2006. 1-16.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622384
dc.description.abstractDuring 2005 the Centre for Research and Evaluation in collaboration with the Widening Participation Policy Unit at Sheffield Hallam University conducted three surveys on behalf of HEFCE to evaluate the impact of Aimhigher . Surveys were sent to all higher education institutions and a sample of further education colleges and work based-learning providers. All three surveys contained a set of core questions for the purpose of comparative analysis. The surveys focused on which activities are delivered through the Aimhigher partnerships, how the activities are perceived to impact on the provider and the apparent effect they have on the progression of target groups to higher education.
dc.publisherHigher Education Research Networken
dc.relation.urlhttp://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2382en
dc.titleDoes Aimhigher work? evidence from the national evaluation
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentSheffield Hallam University
html.description.abstractDuring 2005 the Centre for Research and Evaluation in collaboration with the Widening Participation Policy Unit at Sheffield Hallam University conducted three surveys on behalf of HEFCE to evaluate the impact of Aimhigher . Surveys were sent to all higher education institutions and a sample of further education colleges and work based-learning providers. All three surveys contained a set of core questions for the purpose of comparative analysis. The surveys focused on which activities are delivered through the Aimhigher partnerships, how the activities are perceived to impact on the provider and the apparent effect they have on the progression of target groups to higher education.


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