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dc.contributor.authorGeoghegan, Hilary
dc.contributor.authorMcIlvenna, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorvan der Vaart, Merel
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-16T11:55:07Z
dc.date.available2018-03-16T11:55:07Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-19
dc.identifier.citationGeoghegan, H. et al (2017) 'Developing Local Narratives for Objects in National Collections: Lessons Learned from the “Number Please? Working with the Enfield Exchange” Project', Curator: The Museum Journal, 60 (2):217 .en
dc.identifier.issn00113069
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cura.12201
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622352
dc.description.abstractMuseums of science, technology, and engineering are developing new ways of interpreting and displaying their collections. Increasingly objects are being placed within narratives of everyday use; the human side of technology. The focus of this article is a section of one of the last UK manual telephone switchboards, which was acquired by the Science Museum, London, following its decommissioning in 1960. This artifact offers a unique insight into a communication technology that relied extensively on female telephonists, a distinct way of understanding gender roles in the twentieth century. The authors explore strategies for developing local narratives for objects from national collections and reflect on lessons learned from a cross-institutional collaboration. This article highlights: the value of local historians, community events and oral histories to developing local narratives; how these activities informed understandings of the telephone switchboard; work life in the communications industry; the relationship between women and technology; and practical strategies that can enhance collections and museum practice through collaboration.
dc.description.sponsorshipAHRC funded the original project and collaboration between the Science Museum and Enfield Museum Serviceen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cura.12201en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Curator: The Museum Journalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectMuseumsen
dc.subjectCollaborationen
dc.subjectLocal narrativesen
dc.subjectNational collectionsen
dc.subjectMuseum collectionsen
dc.subjectOral historyen
dc.subjectPublic historyen
dc.titleDeveloping local narratives for objects in national collections: Lessons learned from the “Number Please? Working with the Enfield Exchange” project.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Historical Researchen
dc.identifier.journalCurator: The Museum Journalen
html.description.abstractMuseums of science, technology, and engineering are developing new ways of interpreting and displaying their collections. Increasingly objects are being placed within narratives of everyday use; the human side of technology. The focus of this article is a section of one of the last UK manual telephone switchboards, which was acquired by the Science Museum, London, following its decommissioning in 1960. This artifact offers a unique insight into a communication technology that relied extensively on female telephonists, a distinct way of understanding gender roles in the twentieth century. The authors explore strategies for developing local narratives for objects from national collections and reflect on lessons learned from a cross-institutional collaboration. This article highlights: the value of local historians, community events and oral histories to developing local narratives; how these activities informed understandings of the telephone switchboard; work life in the communications industry; the relationship between women and technology; and practical strategies that can enhance collections and museum practice through collaboration.


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Archived with thanks to Curator: The Museum Journal
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