Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWilson, Andrew Fergus
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T15:04:46Z
dc.date.available2018-03-15T15:04:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-16
dc.identifier.citationWilson, Andrew F. 2018. "#whitegenocide, the Alt-right and Conspiracy Theory: How Secrecy and Suspicion Contributed to the Mainstreaming of Hate." Secrecy and Society 1(2).en
dc.identifier.issn23776188
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622321
dc.description.abstractThis article considers the relationship between “hashtag activism” as it is currently being used by the alt-right and the tendency to draw on conspiracy theory that Richard Hofstadter identified as being prevalent among what he termed “pseudo-conservatives” half a century earlier. Both the alt-right and Hofstadter’s “pseudo-conservatives” can be characterised by a pronounced populist nationalism that understands its aims as protecting a particular way of life whilst drawing on an aggrieved sense of injustice at being conspired against by an unseen enemy. That this “enemy” is typically foreign in actuality or in spirit confirms the cultural dimension on which their politics is played out. It is argued here that this paranoid populist nationalism has been figuratively drawn upon in the rhetoric of Donald Trump and that this apparent openness to the “pseudo-conservative” discourse on nationalism has provided a bridging effect via which far right elements are seeking to normalize extremist viewpoints.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSan Jose State Universityen
dc.relation.urlhttp://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/secrecyandsociety/vol1/iss2/1/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAlt-righten
dc.subjectConspiracy theoriesen
dc.subjectPseudo-conservativesen
dc.subjectRichard Hofstadteren
dc.subjectTwitteren
dc.subjectWhite nationalismen
dc.title#whitegenocide, the alt-right and conspiracy theory: How secrecy and suspicion contributed to the mainstreaming of hate.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalSecrecy & Societyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:49:40Z
html.description.abstractThis article considers the relationship between “hashtag activism” as it is currently being used by the alt-right and the tendency to draw on conspiracy theory that Richard Hofstadter identified as being prevalent among what he termed “pseudo-conservatives” half a century earlier. Both the alt-right and Hofstadter’s “pseudo-conservatives” can be characterised by a pronounced populist nationalism that understands its aims as protecting a particular way of life whilst drawing on an aggrieved sense of injustice at being conspired against by an unseen enemy. That this “enemy” is typically foreign in actuality or in spirit confirms the cultural dimension on which their politics is played out. It is argued here that this paranoid populist nationalism has been figuratively drawn upon in the rhetoric of Donald Trump and that this apparent openness to the “pseudo-conservative” discourse on nationalism has provided a bridging effect via which far right elements are seeking to normalize extremist viewpoints.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Wilson (2018) #whitegenocide, ...
Size:
669.3Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Published PDF (Open Access ...

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/