Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFleur, Stevens
dc.contributor.authorAzara, Iride
dc.contributor.authorMichopoulou, Eleni
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-14T16:30:11Z
dc.date.available2018-03-14T16:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-28
dc.identifier.citationFleur, S. et al (2018) 'Local community attitudes and perceptions towards thermalism' International Journal of Spa and Wellness, DOI: 10.1080/24721735.2018.1432451en
dc.identifier.issn24721735
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/24721735.2018.1432451
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622315
dc.description.abstractThermalism is enjoying a global resurgence of interest as consumers seek out ethical, natural, and place-based wellness experiences. In Europe, the ‘success rate of healing through thermalism has maintained the high reputation of thermal springs with curative powers’. However, thermalism has been culturally lost in the UK. This study focuses on a UK historical spa site currently undergoing restoration. Once restored, this will be one of three UK's only spa hotels with direct access to natural thermal mineral waters. An ethnographic case study design was used to explore community's perceptions and attitudes towards thermalism and the wellness tourism development model being implemented on location. Findings suggest that memories of the values and virtues of thermalism persist within the community and that, if harnessed, can play a significant role in supporting the local and national wellness agenda. However, findings also suggest that the reintroduction of thermal tourism in the location is perceived by the community as a luxury commodity reserved exclusively for the wealthy and elite members of society. Thermalism is a social and cultural resource and thus attention should be paid to ensure that any wellness tourism development model follows a cultural participatory logic and not solely an economic one.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24721735.2018.1432451en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Spa and Wellnessen
dc.subjectCommunityen
dc.subjectThermalismen
dc.subjectWellnessen
dc.subjectTourismen
dc.titleLocal community attitudes and perceptions towards thermalism.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn24721743
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Spa and Wellnessen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK
refterms.dateFOA2019-11-18T16:30:12Z
html.description.abstractThermalism is enjoying a global resurgence of interest as consumers seek out ethical, natural, and place-based wellness experiences. In Europe, the ‘success rate of healing through thermalism has maintained the high reputation of thermal springs with curative powers’. However, thermalism has been culturally lost in the UK. This study focuses on a UK historical spa site currently undergoing restoration. Once restored, this will be one of three UK's only spa hotels with direct access to natural thermal mineral waters. An ethnographic case study design was used to explore community's perceptions and attitudes towards thermalism and the wellness tourism development model being implemented on location. Findings suggest that memories of the values and virtues of thermalism persist within the community and that, if harnessed, can play a significant role in supporting the local and national wellness agenda. However, findings also suggest that the reintroduction of thermal tourism in the location is perceived by the community as a luxury commodity reserved exclusively for the wealthy and elite members of society. Thermalism is a social and cultural resource and thus attention should be paid to ensure that any wellness tourism development model follows a cultural participatory logic and not solely an economic one.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
AzaraI Thermalism AAM.pdf
Size:
588.7Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record