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dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T14:24:08Z
dc.date.available2018-03-13T14:24:08Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-10
dc.identifier.citationGilbert, P. (2015) 'An Evolutionary Approach to Emotion in Mental Health With a Focus on Affiliative Emotions', Emotion Review, 7 (3):230.en
dc.identifier.issn17540739
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1754073915576552
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622300
dc.description.abstractEmotions evolved to guide animals in pursuing specific motives and goals (e.g., to find food, avoid harm, seek out sexual partners, rear offspring). They function as short-term alertors and regulators of behaviour and can be grouped into their evolved functions (evolutionary function analysis). Emotions can coregulate/influence each other, where one emotion can activate or suppress another. Importantly, affiliative emotions, that arise from experiencing validation, care and support from others, have major impacts on how people process and respond to threats and emotions associated with threats. Hence, exploring how affiliative emotional experiences change and transform the capacity to cope with threat and pursue life goals, are salient research issues.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1754073915576552en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Emotion Reviewen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectAffect systemsen
dc.subjectAffiliative emotionsen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectCopingen
dc.subjectEmotionen
dc.titleAn evolutionary approach to emotion in mental health with a focus on affiliative emotions.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn17540747
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEmotion Reviewen
dc.contributor.institutionDerbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Kingsway Hospital, UK
html.description.abstractEmotions evolved to guide animals in pursuing specific motives and goals (e.g., to find food, avoid harm, seek out sexual partners, rear offspring). They function as short-term alertors and regulators of behaviour and can be grouped into their evolved functions (evolutionary function analysis). Emotions can coregulate/influence each other, where one emotion can activate or suppress another. Importantly, affiliative emotions, that arise from experiencing validation, care and support from others, have major impacts on how people process and respond to threats and emotions associated with threats. Hence, exploring how affiliative emotional experiences change and transform the capacity to cope with threat and pursue life goals, are salient research issues.


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