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dc.contributor.authorAkehurst, Sally
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Joanne
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T10:18:10Z
dc.date.available2018-03-13T10:18:10Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-10
dc.identifier.citationAkehurst, S. and Thatcher, J. (2010) 'Narcissism, social anxiety and self-presentation in exercise', Personality and Individual Differences, 49 (2):130.en
dc.identifier.issn01918869
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2010.03.021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622282
dc.description.abstractIn an exercise setting where impression motivation might be high but self-presentation efficacy low, social anxiety is likely to occur (Schlenker & Leary, 1982). Narcissism is, however, associated with low anxiety, high confidence, and a keenness for social evaluation (Wallace, Baumeister, & Vohs, 2005) and therefore may protect exercisers from social anxiety. One hundred and sixty undergraduates (88 males and 72 females; Mage = 20.45 years, SD = 2.49 years) completed measures of narcissism, social anxiety, and self-presentation in exercise. In females, narcissism moderated the impression motivation/construction– social anxiety relationships. Findings extend our understanding of the self-presentational processes involved in exercise and, specifically, how narcissism protects individuals from experiencing high social anxiety.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0191886910001558en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Personality and Individual Differencesen
dc.subjectNarcissismen
dc.subjectSocial Anxietyen
dc.subjectSelf-presentationen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.titleNarcissism, social anxiety and self-presentation in exercise.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAberystwyth Universityen
dc.identifier.journalPersonality and Individual Differencesen
html.description.abstractIn an exercise setting where impression motivation might be high but self-presentation efficacy low, social anxiety is likely to occur (Schlenker & Leary, 1982). Narcissism is, however, associated with low anxiety, high confidence, and a keenness for social evaluation (Wallace, Baumeister, & Vohs, 2005) and therefore may protect exercisers from social anxiety. One hundred and sixty undergraduates (88 males and 72 females; Mage = 20.45 years, SD = 2.49 years) completed measures of narcissism, social anxiety, and self-presentation in exercise. In females, narcissism moderated the impression motivation/construction– social anxiety relationships. Findings extend our understanding of the self-presentational processes involved in exercise and, specifically, how narcissism protects individuals from experiencing high social anxiety.


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