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dc.contributor.authorSommers-Spijkerman, Marion*
dc.contributor.authorTrompetter, Hester*
dc.contributor.authorten Klooster, Peter*
dc.contributor.authorSchreurs, Karlein*
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul*
dc.contributor.authorBohlmeijer, Ernst*
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-22T16:28:27Z
dc.date.available2018-02-22T16:28:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-10
dc.identifier.citationSommers-Spijkerman, M. et al (2017) 'Development and Validation of the Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale—Short Form.' Psychological Assessment, August, DOI: 10.1037/pas0000514en
dc.identifier.issn1939134X
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/pas0000514
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622202
dc.description.abstractStudies investigating the effectiveness of compassion-focused therapy (CFT) are growing rapidly. As CFT is oriented toward helping people deal with internal processes of self-to-self-relating, having instruments to measure these processes is important. The 22-item Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale (FSCRS) has been found a useful measure. In the present study, a 14-item short form of the FSCRS (FSCRS-SF) suited to studies requiring brief measures was developed and tested in a Dutch community sample (N = 363), and cross-validated in a sample consisting of participants in a study on the effectiveness of a guided self-help compassion training (N = 243). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated acceptable to good fit of the FSCRS-SF items to a three-factor model. Findings regarding internal consistency were inconsistent, with Study 1 showing adequate internal consistency for all subscale scores and Study 2 demonstrating satisfactory internal consistency only for the reassured self (RS) subscale score. Furthermore, the results showed that the FSCRS-SF subscale scores had adequate test–retest reliability and satisfactory convergent validity estimates with theoretically related constructs. In addition, the FSCRS-SF subscale scores were found to be sensitive to changes in self-to-self relating over time. Despite mixed findings regarding its reliability requiring further investigation, the FSCRS-SF offers a valid and sensitive measure which shows promise as a complimentary shorter version to the original FSCRS suited to nonclinical populations. Given that the FSCRS is increasingly used as a process and outcome measure, further research on this short form in nonclinical and clinical populations is warranted.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/pas0000514en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychological Assessmenten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectSelf-criticismen
dc.subjectSelf-reassuranceen
dc.subjectQuestionnaireen
dc.subjectPsychometric propertiesen
dc.titleDevelopment and validation of the forms of self-criticizing / attacking and self-reassuring scale - Short form.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn10403590
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Twenteen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalPsychological Assessmenten
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:41:57Z
html.description.abstractStudies investigating the effectiveness of compassion-focused therapy (CFT) are growing rapidly. As CFT is oriented toward helping people deal with internal processes of self-to-self-relating, having instruments to measure these processes is important. The 22-item Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale (FSCRS) has been found a useful measure. In the present study, a 14-item short form of the FSCRS (FSCRS-SF) suited to studies requiring brief measures was developed and tested in a Dutch community sample (N = 363), and cross-validated in a sample consisting of participants in a study on the effectiveness of a guided self-help compassion training (N = 243). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated acceptable to good fit of the FSCRS-SF items to a three-factor model. Findings regarding internal consistency were inconsistent, with Study 1 showing adequate internal consistency for all subscale scores and Study 2 demonstrating satisfactory internal consistency only for the reassured self (RS) subscale score. Furthermore, the results showed that the FSCRS-SF subscale scores had adequate test–retest reliability and satisfactory convergent validity estimates with theoretically related constructs. In addition, the FSCRS-SF subscale scores were found to be sensitive to changes in self-to-self relating over time. Despite mixed findings regarding its reliability requiring further investigation, the FSCRS-SF offers a valid and sensitive measure which shows promise as a complimentary shorter version to the original FSCRS suited to nonclinical populations. Given that the FSCRS is increasingly used as a process and outcome measure, further research on this short form in nonclinical and clinical populations is warranted.


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