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dc.contributor.authorWatkinson, Debbie
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Guy
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-20T14:18:57Z
dc.date.available2018-02-20T14:18:57Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-18
dc.identifier.citationWatkinson, D. and Collins, G. (2016) 'Using recorded sounds in the clinical skills lab.' Nursing Times, 12: 29/30/31, 12-13.en
dc.identifier.issn09547762
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622180
dc.description.abstractClinical simulation is embedded in undergraduate nursing education, but does not always reflect real-life situations. As clinical environments are rarely silent, a team of lecturers decided to find out whether background clinical noise could increase authenticity. This article describes how audio recordings were obtained from a variety of settings. Feedback was gathered on the benefits and barriers to widespread implementation.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEMAP publishing limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/nurse-educators/using-recorded-sounds-inthe-clinical-skills-lab/7008267.articleen
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectClinical skillsen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.titleUsing recorded sounds in the clinical skills lab.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalNursing Timesen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:40:53Z
html.description.abstractClinical simulation is embedded in undergraduate nursing education, but does not always reflect real-life situations. As clinical environments are rarely silent, a team of lecturers decided to find out whether background clinical noise could increase authenticity. This article describes how audio recordings were obtained from a variety of settings. Feedback was gathered on the benefits and barriers to widespread implementation.


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