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dc.contributor.authorCherkassky, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T16:10:55Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T16:10:55Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-17
dc.identifier.citationCherkassky, L. (2018) 'Twenty-seven years of controversy: The perils of PGD', International Journal of Pediatrics and Neonatal Health, 2 (1).en
dc.identifier.issn25724355
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622151
dc.description.abstractIt has been 27 years since the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 was passed in the United Kingdom in response to advances in fertility treatment. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis - the screening of embryos for genetic diseases - has led to lengthy ethical debates on sex selection, eugenics, disabilities, saviour siblings, surplus embryos and most recently, adult-onset diseases (the BRCA cancer gene). This article provides an overview of how the law and practice of PGD in the United Kingdom and United States over the last quarter of a century has developed into new ‘branches’ of PGD, and predicts where they may be heading in the future. It concludes that many of the adverse views on PGD are unfounded and that some of these unique branches may develop to accommodate the screening of additional social traits. An underlying conflict between reproductive autonomy and a right to an open future is also rising under the surface to be noted for the future.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioCoreen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.biocoreopen.org/ijpn/vol_issue.php?req_vol=Volume%202%20Issue%201&req_year=2018&req_mnth=Januaryen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.biocoreopen.org/ijpn/en
dc.subjectEmbryosen
dc.subjectScreeningen
dc.subjectUK lawen
dc.titleTwenty-seven years of controversy: The perils of PGDen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Pediatrics and Neonatal Healthen
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-12-28
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:39:25Z
html.description.abstractIt has been 27 years since the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 was passed in the United Kingdom in response to advances in fertility treatment. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis - the screening of embryos for genetic diseases - has led to lengthy ethical debates on sex selection, eugenics, disabilities, saviour siblings, surplus embryos and most recently, adult-onset diseases (the BRCA cancer gene). This article provides an overview of how the law and practice of PGD in the United Kingdom and United States over the last quarter of a century has developed into new ‘branches’ of PGD, and predicts where they may be heading in the future. It concludes that many of the adverse views on PGD are unfounded and that some of these unique branches may develop to accommodate the screening of additional social traits. An underlying conflict between reproductive autonomy and a right to an open future is also rising under the surface to be noted for the future.


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