Now showing items 1-20 of 45

    • Defining the nature of blended learning through its depiction in current research

      Smith, Karen; Hill, John; University of Derby; University of Hertfordshire (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-18)
      Blended learning has been a feature of higher education practice and research for almost two decades. This article takes stock of current blended learning research, contributing to the growing number of meta-analyses of higher education and blended learning research more generally, through a review of ninety-seven articles relating to blended learning in higher education published in fifteen journals between 2012 and mid-2017. The review focused on where and when the articles were published; their provenance, scale, scope; methodological approach; the broad research themes; and definition of blended learning used. The review shows that despite its ubiquity, blended learning’s definition is all-encompassing; its spread is global but research is dominated by key players; it is of technical interest; and its research is small-scale, individually focused, seeking to evidence the benefits of blended learning. The article concludes with recommendations of how higher education research could provide institutions with evidence to ensure their ‘best of blends’.
    • Wiki literacy: using Wikipedia as a teaching tool

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (LILAC conference, 2019-04)
      Wikipedia has traditionally been viewed with scepticism in higher education, and many academics discourage students from using it at all – a position borne out by our own internal sample of Derby academics. However, statistics show that Wikipedia is still one of the top five most heavily used websites in the world. With this in mind therefore, subject librarians at the University of Derby decided to try a different approach by using Wikipedia as a teaching and learning tool rather than just a source of information. Working with the undergraduate Publishing programme, librarians and academic staff redeveloped an existing module on Content Development to be structured entirely around the use of Wikipedia. Students were set tasks to create new articles, copy edit existing ones, peer review each other’s articles, and research for articles missing citations, thereby developing their academic writing, information literacy and digital skills. An added benefit for Publishing students especially was the opportunity to create content for a worldwide audience, with a potential impact long beyond the usual assignment timeline. In this short presentation we will present on the evolution of this project, our collaborative work with Wikimedia UK and academic staff, and outcomes from the project, including feedback from students and future plans for wider use across the University.
    • Teaching intelligence: putting Wikipedia at the heart of a class.

      Ball, Caroline; University of Derby (Times Higher Education, 2019-05-23)
    • The institutional repository and the library catalogue: adventures in data conversion.

      Rimmer, Sally; University of Derby (CILIP, the Library and Information Association, 2018-12)
    • Towards digital scholarship services in China’s university libraries

      Zhou, Lihong; Huang, Ruhua; Zijlstra, Tim R.; University of Derby; Wuhan University; Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; University of Derby, Derby, UK (2018-09-22)
      Purpose - This paper reports on a literature review with the aim to establish a guiding framework for the development of digital scholarship services in China’s university libraries. Design/methodology/approach - The framework was developed through systematically searching, screening, assessing, coding, and aggregating digital scholarship services as reported in the existing body of literature. Three types of literature were included in the analysis: (1) international academic literature as reported in English; (2) academic literature in Chinese; and (3) relevant professional reports. Findings - The literature analysis pointed to 25 different digital scholarship services, which emerged in six themes: supporting services, formulating research ideas, locating research partners, writing proposals, conducting research, and publishing results. Originality/value - Although this literature review focused on university libraries in China, the research findings and the guiding framework developed provide useful insights and indications that can be shared across international borders.
    • The Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme: A co-created approach to transforming student learning.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (University of Greenwich, 2018-04)
      The value of student as researcher/‘co-producer’ has been well documented in the research literature. This case study outlines an institutional 'student as researcher' initiative that was introduced to enable the co-creation of research by undergraduate students working in partnership with members of academic staff. The paper outlines the establishment and implementation of the scheme and offers a reflection upon and exploration of its perceived value, through the lens of staff and students who participated in it.
    • The didactic diamond - An information literacy model to explain the academic process in higher education.

      Zijlstra, Tim R.; University of Derby (LILAC Conference, 2018-04-06)
      The foundation for the Didactic Diamond was developed with students of the College of Health and Social Care at the University of Derby – in particular the Chesterfield Campus. A significant number of students are so-called atypical learners (ie. returners to education or non-traditional learners) which led to an identified need to provide more robust study skill guidance. Roberts and Ousey (2011) described "finding and using evidence" as the "bane of student life" in relation to student nurses. The Didactic Diamond seeks to ease this problem by introducing students to the process involved with producing good quality academic work. It is used to explain the process from understanding the question and choosing an appropriate topic; utilising information literacy to find appropriate sources; taking notes on the found evidence to gain critical understanding of the topic; using drafting techniques to improve the academic writing and ensuring that the original question is answered fully and critically by utilising the developed resources diligently. Feedback from students on the Didactic Diamond has been positive, the simple figure acts as a mnemonic and provides students with an introduction to the method with a means to remember which steps to take in their academic process. After utilising the Diamond in one-to-one sessions it has been developed into an Academic Writing session for the University Library’s Enhance Your Learning program and has been successfully delivered to a range of students from different cohorts. The Masterclass provides an opportunity to share the Didactic Diamond with a broader audience interested in Information Literacy and embedding Information Literacy in a broader procedural context.
    • 'It was noticeable so I changed': Supergirls, aspirations and Bourdieu.

      Bowers-Brown, Tamsin; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018-11-01)
    • Achieving "transparency, consistency and fairness" in English HE admissions: progress since Schwartz?

      Adnett, Nick; McCaig Colin; Slack, Kim; Bowers-Brown, Tamsin; Sheffield Hallam University (Wiley, 2010-10-27)
      In 2004 the Schwartz Review advised English higher education institutions that their admissions systems should: be transparent; select students who are able to complete their courses based upon achievements and potential; use assessment methods that are reliable and valid; minimise barriers to applicants; be professional; and be underpinned by appropriate institutional structures and processes. These five principles were only expressed as recommendations, reflecting the reluctance of policy makers to interfere with individual higher education institutions' admissions policies. This article analyses the results of research that reviewed the progress that English higher education institutions had made in implementing the Schwartz recommendations and assess whether a more interventionist stance is required to achieve fair admissions.
    • Does Aimhigher work? evidence from the national evaluation

      McCaig Colin; Stevens, Anna; Bowers-Brown, Tamsin; Sheffield Hallam University (Higher Education Research Network, 2006)
      During 2005 the Centre for Research and Evaluation in collaboration with the Widening Participation Policy Unit at Sheffield Hallam University conducted three surveys on behalf of HEFCE to evaluate the impact of Aimhigher . Surveys were sent to all higher education institutions and a sample of further education colleges and work based-learning providers. All three surveys contained a set of core questions for the purpose of comparative analysis. The surveys focused on which activities are delivered through the Aimhigher partnerships, how the activities are perceived to impact on the provider and the apparent effect they have on the progression of target groups to higher education.
    • Aimhigher: achieving social justice?

      McCaig Colin; Bowers-Brown, Tamsin; Sheffield Hallam University (British Educational Research Association Annual Conference, 2007-09)
      This paper will aim to determine how successful Aimhigher is as a potential mechanism of social justice. It is concerned primarily with the aims and intentions of the programme and how it has developed over a six year period since the launch of Excellence Challenge in 2001. It is not intended as critique of widening participation policies and practices generally; there is an ample body of literature that questions the impact of widening participation and even the notion of barriers to higher education for some groups (see particularly Gorard et al: 2006). The authors of the current paper believe that, while there are caveats about the lack of comparable datasets or 'smoking gun' causal links between intervention and enrolment, such policies are generally successful in raising educational attainment and raising aspirations and awareness of HE among underrepresented groups. The authors draw on their own and others' research that support the notion that Aimhigher in particular makes a positive difference (Bowers-Brown et al 2006, CRE 2005, McCaig & Bowers-Brown 2007, Hatt et al, EKOS,2007). As such, this paper can be seen as 'friendly fire' rather than a full frontal attack on methodological or ideological grounds. However, we will conclude that Aimhigher fails to fulfil its potential to be a force for social justice, in part because of a fundamental weakness in the concept of Aimhigher, and in part because of structural weaknesses in the operation of Aimhigher partnerships.
    • Constituting neoliberal subjects? Aspiration as technology of government in UK policy discourse

      Spohrer, Konstanze; Stahl, Garth; Bowers-Brown, Tamsin; Sheffield Hallam University (Routledge, 2017-06-05)
      Since the 2000s, successive governments in the United Kingdom and elsewhere have embraced the idea of raising aspiration among young people as a solution to persisting educational and socio-economic inequalities. Previous analyses have argued that these policies tend to individualise structural disadvantage and promote a deficit view of working-class youth. This paper adopts a novel approach to analysing aspiration discourses combining Michel Foucault's four dimensions of ethics and Mitchell Dean's notion of formation of identities. Applying Foucault's and Dean's work in this way provides a new lens that enables an examination of how policy encourages particular forms of subjectivation, and, therefore, seeks to govern individuals. The findings presented in the paper complicate previous research by showing that raising aspiration strategies portray disadvantaged youth both in terms of deficit and potential, resulting in a requirement for inner transformation and mobility through attitudinal change. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for the identity formation of young people and for conceptualising contemporary forms of governmentality.
    • Impact assessment in higher education : A strategic view from the UK.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby; University of Derby Derby United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Emerald, 2018-01-08)
      This article focuses on the importance of impact in higher education from a strategic perspective, exploring its value to institutions, learners and prospective students in today’s higher education context, using the UK as a case study. The increasing prominence of impact in HEPs is discussed, with consideration given to the operational structures and approaches which can be adopted to enable the monitoring and evaluation of impact in higher education providers.
    • The strategic perspective.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-31)
    • Lecturing, working with groups and providing individual support.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014-08-14)
    • Curriculum-based library assessment at De Montfort University

      Cavanagh, Paul; De Montfort University (2012-05-22)
    • A collaborative approach

      Kay, James; University of Derby (JISC, 2014-04-18)
      James Kay, Library Subscriptions & Document Delivery Librarian at the University of Derby, makes the case for a collaborative approach to planning and decision making amongst HE/FE library and information practitioners.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making and continuing best practice in academic libraries

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-03-31)
      HE/FE institutions are increasingly user focused and must meet the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of its users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political- and sector-wide institutional need to better account for and spend library budgets. This session will discuss how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to determine how effectively library resources are managed and planned, collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.