• A tale of two systems: Discovery at the University of Derby

      Kay, James; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
    • Teaching intelligence: putting Wikipedia at the heart of a class.

      Ball, Caroline; University of Derby (Times Higher Education, 2019-05-23)
    • Think global, collaborate local: cross-team working to develop students' employability skills

      White, Jonathan; Balder, Mikaela; University of Derby (2014-06-16)
      This presentation gives the background to a small project undertaken at the Buxton campus. The project was aimed at final year students, as a way to enable them to turn the 'academic' skills developed at University into skills they can utilise in the workplace. This idea for an 'outduction' event allowed for different student-facing support teams to work together. This presentation shows how two of those services, the Library and the International Student Centre, identified crossover between information literacy skills and the attributes required of 'global graduates'.
    • Towards digital scholarship services in China’s university libraries

      Zhou, Lihong; Huang, Ruhua; Zijlstra, Tim R.; University of Derby; Wuhan University; Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; University of Derby, Derby, UK (2018-09-22)
      Purpose - This paper reports on a literature review with the aim to establish a guiding framework for the development of digital scholarship services in China’s university libraries. Design/methodology/approach - The framework was developed through systematically searching, screening, assessing, coding, and aggregating digital scholarship services as reported in the existing body of literature. Three types of literature were included in the analysis: (1) international academic literature as reported in English; (2) academic literature in Chinese; and (3) relevant professional reports. Findings - The literature analysis pointed to 25 different digital scholarship services, which emerged in six themes: supporting services, formulating research ideas, locating research partners, writing proposals, conducting research, and publishing results. Originality/value - Although this literature review focused on university libraries in China, the research findings and the guiding framework developed provide useful insights and indications that can be shared across international borders.
    • “Towards professional multilingualism?” Reconceptualising the school coordinator role in Initial Teacher Training.

      Butcher, John; Mutton, Trevor; University College Falmouth; Oxford University (Routledge, 2008)
      This article explores the school coordinator role in Initial Teacher Training (ITT) in England. Recognising that mentoring is fully embedded and highly researched in ITT, it argues the role of the coordinator, while integral to partnerships (DfE, 1992) is far less researched. We investigate tensions in the role, between managing programme-wide quality assurance, teaching professional studies and developing school-based mentors. These questions were explored through multi-site case studies with four HEIs and their partner schools in four linked phases of data collection. Data analysis established a range of different conceptualisations of the role, with only limited evidence of a development role with their mentors. We argue for policies which establish a more coherent conceptualisation of the role, and an agreed nomenclature. A key recommendation is to free coordinators from bureaucratic demands on their time to enable them to exemplify a new “professional multilingualism”.
    • The Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme: A co-created approach to transforming student learning.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (University of Greenwich, 2018-04)
      The value of student as researcher/‘co-producer’ has been well documented in the research literature. This case study outlines an institutional 'student as researcher' initiative that was introduced to enable the co-creation of research by undergraduate students working in partnership with members of academic staff. The paper outlines the establishment and implementation of the scheme and offers a reflection upon and exploration of its perceived value, through the lens of staff and students who participated in it.
    • University of Derby year 10 white working-class boys pilot programme

      Astley, Jo; University of Derby (FACE, 2019-07-03)
    • Using media based case studies to create spaces for students to practice theory

      Higson, Rob; University of Derby (Association for Learning Technology, 2016-09-06)
      How can we create a space for students to practice with a theory? Can we make a theory tangible, developing employability skills alongside it, within an assessment? As Henry Jenkins, Professor of Communication, Journalism and Cinematic Arts asks “What are you asking your students to do with what you teach them? How are they able to adapt it in a timely and meaningful fashion from knowledge to skill?” (Jenkins, 2010). This presentation explores work carried out to bring theories to life in a mode which allows students to apply them to real world inspired scenarios. In 2015, the Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Team worked with academic staff from Health and Social Care subjects to create a case study based on the experiences of Health Care Professionals. Where previously written, content now consisted of video and other media, which students assessed from the perspective of a Health Care Assessor, developing observational assessment skills in relation to theoretical principles in the process. Spreading the case study over different segmented media provided a learning experience more akin to the real world as students were expected to “weigh the reliability of information that emerges in different contexts” (Jenkins, 2010) through developing “the capacity to seek out, evaluate, and integrate information conveyed across multiple media.” (Jenkins, 2010) By utilising these transmedia storytelling (Jenkins 2010) methods, learning resources can “use hermeneutic codes to raise questions in the minds of the audience; their desire to have these questions answered is what drives them forward through the narrative.” (Long, 2007, p. 166) Feedback from students suggests that this approach was effective and enhanced their learning experience: “It gave us an opportunity to practice, and learn from, skills such as observation and helped us to reflect on what we would actually do and see in real life practice. Very insightful” (Anonymous Student, 2015). One student also commented on the use of video over a written case study, “You could see details of Maggie’s house that a written case study would missed out. Also as a visual learner I found it helped to read Maggie’s body language.” (Anonymous Student, 2015). The methods developed during this project have led to further subject areas recreating the practice with similarly successful results. This presentation will demonstrate how applying transmedia storytelling methods to the creation of case studies can engage learners in the practice based theory of their subject area and embed critical employability skills within their learning. It will develop within delegates an understanding of how media based learning technologies can be used to enhance the digital content of modules relevant to their subject discipline.
    • ‘We will take them from anywhere’: schools working within multiple initial teacher training partnerships

      Mutton, Trevor; Butcher, John; Oxford University; University College Falmouth (Routledge, 2008-02)
      This article reports on a small-scale study focusing on the role of the initial teacher training (ITT) coordinator in schools in England in terms of working simultaneously across and within a number of different ITT partnerships. Data collection involved a review of the relevant course documentation of the four main higher education institutions working in one region, a postal questionnaire to 113 primary schools and secondary schools within that region and semistructured telephone interviews with six school-based ITT coordinators. The data were analysed within broad categories identifying the facilitators and constraints of carrying out the role when working in partnership with a number of different ITT providers. The findings indicate that there is a developing trend towards schools in England working with multiple partners, particularly in the case of secondary schools and that, notwithstanding the administrative difficulties sometimes caused, there are clear perceived advantages to working in such a way, both for the schools themselves and for the trainees in those schools. The implications of this in terms of partnerships between schools and ITT providers are explored, as are the
    • Wiki literacy: using Wikipedia as a teaching tool

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (LILAC conference, 2019-04)
      Wikipedia has traditionally been viewed with scepticism in higher education, and many academics discourage students from using it at all – a position borne out by our own internal sample of Derby academics. However, statistics show that Wikipedia is still one of the top five most heavily used websites in the world. With this in mind therefore, subject librarians at the University of Derby decided to try a different approach by using Wikipedia as a teaching and learning tool rather than just a source of information. Working with the undergraduate Publishing programme, librarians and academic staff redeveloped an existing module on Content Development to be structured entirely around the use of Wikipedia. Students were set tasks to create new articles, copy edit existing ones, peer review each other’s articles, and research for articles missing citations, thereby developing their academic writing, information literacy and digital skills. An added benefit for Publishing students especially was the opportunity to create content for a worldwide audience, with a potential impact long beyond the usual assignment timeline. In this short presentation we will present on the evolution of this project, our collaborative work with Wikimedia UK and academic staff, and outcomes from the project, including feedback from students and future plans for wider use across the University.
    • WikiLiteracy: enhancing students' digital literacy with Wikipedia

      Ball, Caroline; University of Derby (CILIP Information Literacy Group, 2019-12-03)
      In January 2019 the University of Derby delivered its first module entirely dedicated to and structured around editing and writing articles for Wikipedia. The course focused on using Wikipedia as a means to improve students’ skills in writing for public consumption, in addition to enhancing their digital and collaborative skills. Students contributed to 118 articles across a range of topics, which were viewed over 11.2 million times, providing them with a public platform no university assignment could match, and introduced them to the challenges of interaction and engagement in a global editing community. Students’ confidence in their digital capabilities was assessed at the start and end of the module and showed a clear increase in confidence across all categories.