• Lecturing, working with groups and providing individual support.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014-08-14)
    • Curriculum-based library assessment at De Montfort University

      Cavanagh, Paul; De Montfort University (2012-05-22)
    • A collaborative approach

      Kay, James; University of Derby (JISC, 2014-04-18)
      James Kay, Library Subscriptions & Document Delivery Librarian at the University of Derby, makes the case for a collaborative approach to planning and decision making amongst HE/FE library and information practitioners.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making and continuing best practice in academic libraries

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-03-31)
      HE/FE institutions are increasingly user focused and must meet the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of its users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political- and sector-wide institutional need to better account for and spend library budgets. This session will discuss how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to determine how effectively library resources are managed and planned, collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making for collection management.

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-07-20)
      Universities face the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political and sector-wide institutional need to manage and better account for library budgets. This talk will focus on how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to manage and plan library resources effectively; collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • A tale of two systems – Library Plus and Discover: EDS at the University of Derby

      Kay, James; Martindale, Graham; University of Derby (2016-07-06)
      In the autumn of 2013 the University of Derby Library launched Library Plus, our name for the EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS), aimed exclusively at HE students. The Library launched a second EDS tool named Discover in 2015, used by FE and Access Students attending our partner organisation Buxton & Leek College. As a member of the working team involved in the implementation of Discover, I had the opportunity to help set up, design and test a new EDS tool from scratch. This presentation will describe how Discover was created, the problems I encountered during implementation, and the successes and lessons I learnt from introducing EDS in an FE institution. Discover also presented the Library with new opportunities to look at the functionality of Library Plus, and how to promote it more effectively to our HE students. It also highlights the challenges of maintaining two similar, but altogether different EDS systems, for the needs of an increasingly diverse student body.
    • A tale of two systems: Discovery at the University of Derby

      Kay, James; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
    • A day in the life of a subscriptions and document delivery librarian

      Kay, James; University of Derby (Ubiquity Press, 2016-07-05)
      In his role as part of the Learning Resources Development & Delivery team at the University of Derby, James Kay shares responsibility for acquisitions, serials, e-resources, inter-library loans, online reading lists, copyright and cataloguing.
    • So you didn't get your Hogwarts letter: engaging muggles in the library experience

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
      The poster details the stages of the library's ongoing audio tour projects using the Aurasma augmented reality app.
    • Defining delivery (@Derby): upgrading support for online learners

      Butler, Emma; Ayre, Lucy; DaCosta, Jacqui; University of Derby (2016-03-22)
      Online learning at the University of Derby has grown in leaps and bounds over the last few years. As this form of learning has advanced, so has the support from the Library to help develop information and digitally literate students. This short paper will outline the key milestones and on-going support initiatives that characterise an effective collaboration across the University.
    • The survival and development of UK public libraries under the global financial crisis

      Zhou, Lihong; Huang, Ruhua; Zijlstra, Tim R.; Loughborough University; Wuhan University (China Knowledge Network Beijing (CKNI), 2015)
      This paper discusses the survival and development of the public libraries in UK under the currentglobal financial crisis,as well as the severe problems of public funding cuts,public library closures,staff loss and significant decrease in service quality.
    • Using media based case studies to create spaces for students to practice theory

      Higson, Rob; University of Derby (Association for Learning Technology, 2016-09-06)
      How can we create a space for students to practice with a theory? Can we make a theory tangible, developing employability skills alongside it, within an assessment? As Henry Jenkins, Professor of Communication, Journalism and Cinematic Arts asks “What are you asking your students to do with what you teach them? How are they able to adapt it in a timely and meaningful fashion from knowledge to skill?” (Jenkins, 2010). This presentation explores work carried out to bring theories to life in a mode which allows students to apply them to real world inspired scenarios. In 2015, the Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Team worked with academic staff from Health and Social Care subjects to create a case study based on the experiences of Health Care Professionals. Where previously written, content now consisted of video and other media, which students assessed from the perspective of a Health Care Assessor, developing observational assessment skills in relation to theoretical principles in the process. Spreading the case study over different segmented media provided a learning experience more akin to the real world as students were expected to “weigh the reliability of information that emerges in different contexts” (Jenkins, 2010) through developing “the capacity to seek out, evaluate, and integrate information conveyed across multiple media.” (Jenkins, 2010) By utilising these transmedia storytelling (Jenkins 2010) methods, learning resources can “use hermeneutic codes to raise questions in the minds of the audience; their desire to have these questions answered is what drives them forward through the narrative.” (Long, 2007, p. 166) Feedback from students suggests that this approach was effective and enhanced their learning experience: “It gave us an opportunity to practice, and learn from, skills such as observation and helped us to reflect on what we would actually do and see in real life practice. Very insightful” (Anonymous Student, 2015). One student also commented on the use of video over a written case study, “You could see details of Maggie’s house that a written case study would missed out. Also as a visual learner I found it helped to read Maggie’s body language.” (Anonymous Student, 2015). The methods developed during this project have led to further subject areas recreating the practice with similarly successful results. This presentation will demonstrate how applying transmedia storytelling methods to the creation of case studies can engage learners in the practice based theory of their subject area and embed critical employability skills within their learning. It will develop within delegates an understanding of how media based learning technologies can be used to enhance the digital content of modules relevant to their subject discipline.
    • Rejuvenating UDEL

      Boland, Jill; University of Derby (2010-03)
      Abstract The purpose of my poster is to illustrate the development of a number of resources designed to aid in the learning and teaching of information skills, either as part of a skills session in the library or pc lab, or as part of self-directed study. It will highlight the aims of the Information Skills project team at the University of Derby, along with a timeline for the project to the present day. Included will be information on the tutorials currently completed using the Adobe Captivate software, with screenshots of same to show some of the creative standards agreed upon. As a starting point for the project we used the library catalogue as the 'test' piece which was trialled among the student body, feedback from which led to the consolidation of the standards employed in all demonstrations as well as to modifications to the original example tutorial. Examples of some of the questions asked during the trial will be included on the poster to illustrate what feedback we were looking for. The poster will also include projections for the future, highlighting the directions in which we look to take the project as it becomes incorporated into the daily work of subject librarians at the University. It will also indicate how we plan to measure the impact of these resources on the student experience and use the subsequent feedback to further develop and improve those resources for the future. Handouts detailing key points from the poster will be available for colleagues to take away with them, and if possible a demonstration of one of the tutorials will also take place. Two of the tutorials are publically available without VLE access and those links will be included on the handout for colleagues to look at in their own time.
    • From Lampitt to libraries: formulating state standards to embed information literacy across colleges

      DaCosta, Jacqui; Dubicki, Eleonora; Georgian Court University; Monmouth University (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012)
      In September 2007, the Lampitt Law was passed in the state of New Jersey, formalizing the requirements for students transferring between institutions. This led to a 2008 statewide articulation agreement to facilitate the seamless transfer of students’ courses and credits between county colleges and four-year public institutions of higher education. In response to this articulation agreement, three professional librarian groups combined to create information literacy standards utilizing progression as a core principle. The Information Literacy Progression Standards were launched in January 2010. They consist of a four-page document comprising an introduction; the standards defining competencies at a Novice/Introductory (Year 1) level and at a Gateway/Developing (Year 2) level; and some sample assignments demonstrating the Standards in Practice. This article outlines how the Standards were developed and successfully disseminated and implemented. As well as describing the creation of the Standards, the article highlights initiatives at several academic institutions where librarians have attempted to address information literacy at an organizational level, utilizing successful collaborations with faculty and administrators..
    • Think global, collaborate local: cross-team working to develop students' employability skills

      White, Jonathan; Balder, Mikaela; University of Derby (2014-06-16)
      This presentation gives the background to a small project undertaken at the Buxton campus. The project was aimed at final year students, as a way to enable them to turn the 'academic' skills developed at University into skills they can utilise in the workplace. This idea for an 'outduction' event allowed for different student-facing support teams to work together. This presentation shows how two of those services, the Library and the International Student Centre, identified crossover between information literacy skills and the attributes required of 'global graduates'.
    • Canoodling with careers: cross-team working in information literacy

      Carnegie, Maria; White, Jonathan; Vivian-Shaw, Vanessa; University of Derby (2014-04-24)
      This workshop will explore how support services can work together to deliver information literacy across an institution. Traditionally Librarians have collaborated solely with Academics to develop and deliver information literacy interventions and support for students, but Librarian teams are very often co-located in teams providing wider services. This can include working in professional teams encompassing careers and employability professionals, learning technologists, study skills/academic skills teachers and IT skills trainers. At University of Derby the Library service is part of the Institute for Learning Enhancement and Innovation, which encompasses all of these services. This workshop will build upon work done by the three presenters, who are based at the Buxton campus, to find linkages between the work of Library Academic Services team of Subject Librarians and the work done by the Careers Consultants. Working together, the presenters found that both teams were developing and delivering sessions around the same core set of digital and information literacy skills, but from different perspectives. This has led to the development and delivery of joint compulsory lectures and workshops, voluntary workshops, and a joint ‘roaming’ service to students based at the multiple sites around the town. Delivered as a workshop, this session will engage participants in a range of group work activities, including: ‘Identifying overlapping skills teaching within support teams’, ‘What makes teams work? How can diverse teams work together on IL?’ and ‘Discussion on issues and good practice sharing’. The first two of these activities will involve a group discussion and a mind mapping activity on the personality and cultural dimensions of working with members of others teams. The good practice sharing will take the form of a ‘speed dating’ style activity where participants move around the room gaining new ideas and passing on experiences. Attending this workshop will allow participants to share good practice and will benefit from identifying opportunities for cross-team working within their own institution. In addition they will gain ideas on how to approach members of other teams to facilitate information literacy projects.
    • Study Bugs do a poster presentation

      Butler, Emma; Carnegie, Maria; Plant, Steve; University of Derby (2011-07)
      The poster describes the concepts behind, and the development of, a series of short films which deliver study skills information to students using an informal, imaginative and slightly quirky style. The stars of the films are the study bugs, who have taken on a life of their own, presenting important information in their own inimitable style. The videos have been used in teaching sessions, at Derby and other universities, to reinforce taught content and engage students in discussion. The films are available online through YouTube and can be embedded into VLEs. They have had positive feedback from academics and students. The films are accessible to students from different academic and cultural backgrounds, highlighting core concepts in a straightforward manner.
    • Is there an information literacy skills gap to be bridged? An examination of faculty perceptions and activities relating to information literacy in the United States and England.

      DaCosta, Jacqui; College of New Jersey (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2010-05)
      Surveys of faculty were conducted at two higher education institutions in England and the United States to ascertain their perceptions of information literacy. Faculty were also asked about the extent to which they incorporated information literacy skills into their courses. Similarities were found across the two institutions both in the importance that faculty attached to information skills and what they actually did to incorporate the skills within curricula. The results reflect an information literacy skills gap between what faculty (and librarians) want for their students and the practical reality. Librarians and faculty should work collaboratively together to bridge this gap.
    • Developing students' information and research skills via Blackboard

      DaCosta, Jacqui; Jones, Becky; College of New Jersey; Loughborough University (2007)
      This paper summarizes work undertaken at De Montfort University (Leicester, UK) to develop students’ information and research skills using the Blackboard Virtual Learning Environment. It outlines how a traditionally delivered and assessed program was reviewed and revised in order to produce a blended learning experience for students. The librarians involved undertook this project with students from the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences during March/April 2005, teaching two groups in parallel--one group using Blackboard and another using the traditional teaching method. Both groups were given a diagnostic evaluation to gauge their confidence levels with both information skills and using Blackboard, and to obtain their perceptions of their experiences. Both groups underwent a formal summative assessment with one group using Blackboard and the control group having a paper-based assignment. The Blackboard sessions were very popular with students and this method of teaching has subsequently been extended to other modules within the university. Students appeared to be more motivated and appreciated the constant availability of the learning materials. This project was the first example within the university of students undertaking a formal online assessment using Blackboard, and the librarians received a Curriculum Development and Innovation Award. The work was subsequently disseminated within the university, where it was well received