• Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making and continuing best practice in academic libraries

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-03-31)
      HE/FE institutions are increasingly user focused and must meet the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of its users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political- and sector-wide institutional need to better account for and spend library budgets. This session will discuss how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to determine how effectively library resources are managed and planned, collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making for collection management.

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-07-20)
      Universities face the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political and sector-wide institutional need to manage and better account for library budgets. This talk will focus on how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to manage and plan library resources effectively; collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Mentoring as an intervention to promote gender equality in academic medicine: a systematic review

      House, Allan; Dracup, Naila; Burkinshaw, Paula; Ward, Vicky; Bryant, Louise D; University of Leeds; University of Derby; University of St Andrews (BMJ, 2021-01-26)
      Mentoring is frequently suggested as an intervention to address gender inequalities in the workplace. To systematically review evidence published since a definitive review in 2006 on the effectiveness of mentoring interventions aimed at achieving gender equality in academic medicine. Systematic Review, using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication as a template for data extraction and synthesis. Studies were included if they described a specific mentoring intervention in a medical school or analogous academic healthcare organisation and included results from an evaluation of the intervention. Mentoring was defined as (1) a formally organised intervention entailing a supportive relationship between a mentor, defined as a more senior/experienced person and a mentee defined as a more junior/inexperienced person; (2) mentoring intervention involved academic career support (3) the mentoring relationship was outside line management or supervision of performance and was defined by contact over an extended period of time. The impact of mentoring was usually reported at the level of individual participants, for example, satisfaction and well-being or self-reported career progression. We sought evidence of impact on gender equality via reports of organisation-level effectiveness, of promotion or retention, pay and academic performance of female staff. We identified 32 publications: 8 review articles, 20 primary observational studies and 4 randomised controlled trials. A further 19 discussed mentoring in relation to gender but did not meet our eligibility criteria. The terminology used, and the structures and processes reported as constituting mentoring, varied greatly. We identified that mentoring is popular with many who receive it; however, we found no robust evidence of effectiveness in reducing gender inequalities. Primary research used weak evaluation designs. Mentoring is a complex intervention. Future evaluations should adopt standardised approaches used in applied health research to the design and evaluation of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.
    • Off-campus learning and employability in undergraduate design: the Sorrell Young Design project as an innovative partnership

      Butcher, John; University of Northampton (Intellect, 2008)
      This article reports on research which explored the opportunity for extra-curricular undergraduate learning afforded by the Young Design Project (YDP), aimed at bringing together HE Design students, industry and schools. The research was undertaken in the context of the importance attached to ‘employability’ as a key driver for recent policy developments in Higher Education (see Leitch review and Cox report), as well as the political importance of Widening Participation initiatives between HEIs and schools. This research investigated the second iteration of the YDP in 2007, with 32 undergraduate students from two design degrees at University College Falmouth (BA Graphic Design and BA Spatial Design) on a project based in four Cornish schools (three secondary, one primary). The research sought to answer the question: what do undergraduate students learn from working with pupils as clients and industry practitioners in the context of a school-based project? This question is explored through a case study drawing on four triangulated phases of data collection: desk research of relevant policy documentation; pre-project semi-structured questionnaire; post-project focus group interviews and individual face-to-face interviews with key gatekeepers. As well as reflecting on the opportunity to engage with innovative learning in design, the findings offer fruitful insights to HE practitioners and policy makers considering issues around off-campus learning. This research recommends notions of ‘employability’ be subject to greater scrutiny in HE policy, since a key finding from this research is the crucial importance of appropriately resourced authentic project partnerships for deep and worthwhile undergraduate learning to take place.
    • Rejuvenating UDEL

      Boland, Jill; University of Derby (2010-03)
      Abstract The purpose of my poster is to illustrate the development of a number of resources designed to aid in the learning and teaching of information skills, either as part of a skills session in the library or pc lab, or as part of self-directed study. It will highlight the aims of the Information Skills project team at the University of Derby, along with a timeline for the project to the present day. Included will be information on the tutorials currently completed using the Adobe Captivate software, with screenshots of same to show some of the creative standards agreed upon. As a starting point for the project we used the library catalogue as the 'test' piece which was trialled among the student body, feedback from which led to the consolidation of the standards employed in all demonstrations as well as to modifications to the original example tutorial. Examples of some of the questions asked during the trial will be included on the poster to illustrate what feedback we were looking for. The poster will also include projections for the future, highlighting the directions in which we look to take the project as it becomes incorporated into the daily work of subject librarians at the University. It will also indicate how we plan to measure the impact of these resources on the student experience and use the subsequent feedback to further develop and improve those resources for the future. Handouts detailing key points from the poster will be available for colleagues to take away with them, and if possible a demonstration of one of the tutorials will also take place. Two of the tutorials are publically available without VLE access and those links will be included on the handout for colleagues to look at in their own time.
    • So you didn't get your Hogwarts letter: engaging muggles in the library experience

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
      The poster details the stages of the library's ongoing audio tour projects using the Aurasma augmented reality app.
    • The strategic perspective.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-31)
    • Study Bugs do a poster presentation

      Butler, Emma; Carnegie, Maria; Plant, Steve; University of Derby (2011-07)
      The poster describes the concepts behind, and the development of, a series of short films which deliver study skills information to students using an informal, imaginative and slightly quirky style. The stars of the films are the study bugs, who have taken on a life of their own, presenting important information in their own inimitable style. The videos have been used in teaching sessions, at Derby and other universities, to reinforce taught content and engage students in discussion. The films are available online through YouTube and can be embedded into VLEs. They have had positive feedback from academics and students. The films are accessible to students from different academic and cultural backgrounds, highlighting core concepts in a straightforward manner.
    • The survival and development of UK public libraries under the global financial crisis

      Zhou, Lihong; Huang, Ruhua; Zijlstra, Tim R.; Loughborough University; Wuhan University (China Knowledge Network Beijing (CKNI), 2015)
      This paper discusses the survival and development of the public libraries in UK under the currentglobal financial crisis,as well as the severe problems of public funding cuts,public library closures,staff loss and significant decrease in service quality.
    • A tale of two systems – Library Plus and Discover: EDS at the University of Derby

      Kay, James; Martindale, Graham; University of Derby (2016-07-06)
      In the autumn of 2013 the University of Derby Library launched Library Plus, our name for the EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS), aimed exclusively at HE students. The Library launched a second EDS tool named Discover in 2015, used by FE and Access Students attending our partner organisation Buxton & Leek College. As a member of the working team involved in the implementation of Discover, I had the opportunity to help set up, design and test a new EDS tool from scratch. This presentation will describe how Discover was created, the problems I encountered during implementation, and the successes and lessons I learnt from introducing EDS in an FE institution. Discover also presented the Library with new opportunities to look at the functionality of Library Plus, and how to promote it more effectively to our HE students. It also highlights the challenges of maintaining two similar, but altogether different EDS systems, for the needs of an increasingly diverse student body.
    • A tale of two systems: Discovery at the University of Derby

      Kay, James; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
    • Teaching intelligence: putting Wikipedia at the heart of a class.

      Ball, Caroline; University of Derby (Times Higher Education, 2019-05-23)
    • Think global, collaborate local: cross-team working to develop students' employability skills

      White, Jonathan; Balder, Mikaela; University of Derby (2014-06-16)
      This presentation gives the background to a small project undertaken at the Buxton campus. The project was aimed at final year students, as a way to enable them to turn the 'academic' skills developed at University into skills they can utilise in the workplace. This idea for an 'outduction' event allowed for different student-facing support teams to work together. This presentation shows how two of those services, the Library and the International Student Centre, identified crossover between information literacy skills and the attributes required of 'global graduates'.
    • Times they are a changing: evaluating interventions in a new era

      Astley, Jo; Church, Emma; University of Derby; East Midlands Widening Participation Research and Evaluation Partnership (FACE, 2021-03-24)
      This chapter will outline the University of Derby’s response to that APP requirement of evidence-based practice to address the inequitable HE outcomes of under-represented groups. It will firstly share the University’s current evaluation practices concerning access, in which the East Midlands Widening Participation Research and Evaluation Partnership (EMWPREP) plays such a key role. It will then move on to demonstrate how the University has utilised Theory of Change to embed evidence-based practice across the whole student lifecycle, and discuss the methods and methodologies that will be adopted within a new framework to evaluate interventions, and identify new areas for research. The chapter concludes by reflecting on key areas of focus required by the University through the 2019-2020 academic year, in order for the institution to be well equipped to meet its APP reporting requirements when the first monitoring return is due in spring 2022. It will also reflect on the challenges that the institution faces (as well as the sector as a whole), in order to fulfil OfS expectations.
    • Towards digital scholarship services in China’s university libraries

      Zhou, Lihong; Huang, Ruhua; Zijlstra, Tim R.; University of Derby; Wuhan University; Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; University of Derby, Derby, UK (2018-09-22)
      Purpose - This paper reports on a literature review with the aim to establish a guiding framework for the development of digital scholarship services in China’s university libraries. Design/methodology/approach - The framework was developed through systematically searching, screening, assessing, coding, and aggregating digital scholarship services as reported in the existing body of literature. Three types of literature were included in the analysis: (1) international academic literature as reported in English; (2) academic literature in Chinese; and (3) relevant professional reports. Findings - The literature analysis pointed to 25 different digital scholarship services, which emerged in six themes: supporting services, formulating research ideas, locating research partners, writing proposals, conducting research, and publishing results. Originality/value - Although this literature review focused on university libraries in China, the research findings and the guiding framework developed provide useful insights and indications that can be shared across international borders.
    • “Towards professional multilingualism?” Reconceptualising the school coordinator role in Initial Teacher Training.

      Butcher, John; Mutton, Trevor; University College Falmouth; Oxford University (Routledge, 2008)
      This article explores the school coordinator role in Initial Teacher Training (ITT) in England. Recognising that mentoring is fully embedded and highly researched in ITT, it argues the role of the coordinator, while integral to partnerships (DfE, 1992) is far less researched. We investigate tensions in the role, between managing programme-wide quality assurance, teaching professional studies and developing school-based mentors. These questions were explored through multi-site case studies with four HEIs and their partner schools in four linked phases of data collection. Data analysis established a range of different conceptualisations of the role, with only limited evidence of a development role with their mentors. We argue for policies which establish a more coherent conceptualisation of the role, and an agreed nomenclature. A key recommendation is to free coordinators from bureaucratic demands on their time to enable them to exemplify a new “professional multilingualism”.
    • Treat-to-target strategies in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

      Hock, Emma Stefania; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Wailoo, Allan; Scott, David L.; Stevenson, Matt; Rawdin, Andrew; Simpson, Emma L.; Dracup, Naila; Young, Adam; University of Sheffield; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-01-25)
      To systematically review clinical and health economic impacts of treat-to-target (TTT) strategies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) managed in specialist units, compared with routine care. Sixteen and seven electronic databases were searched for clinical RCTs and cost-effectiveness respectively. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment (Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias criteria) were performed. Evidence was reported by (1) TTT vs. usual care; (2) comparison of different treatment protocols against each other; (3) comparison of different targets against each other. Narrative synthesis was undertaken and conclusions drawn on a trial by trial basis, due to study heterogeneity. Twenty-two RCTs were included. Sixteen were at high risk of bias, five unclear and one low risk. Three trials showed TTT to be more effective than usual care in terms of remissions, in some or all comparisons, whereas one other trial reported no significant difference. Two trials showed TTT to be more effective than usual care in terms of low disease activity (LDA), in some or all comparisons, whereas two trials reported little difference. Some evidence suggests that TTT strategies involving combination therapy can achieve more remissions than those involving monotherapy, but little impact of alternative treatment targets on remission or LDA. Overall, there is evidence that TTT increases remissions in early RA and mixed early and established RA populations, and increases LDA in established RA. Although results varied, typically TTT was estimated to be more cost-effective than usual care. No target appears more effective than others.
    • The Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme: A co-created approach to transforming student learning.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (University of Greenwich, 2018-04)
      The value of student as researcher/‘co-producer’ has been well documented in the research literature. This case study outlines an institutional 'student as researcher' initiative that was introduced to enable the co-creation of research by undergraduate students working in partnership with members of academic staff. The paper outlines the establishment and implementation of the scheme and offers a reflection upon and exploration of its perceived value, through the lens of staff and students who participated in it.
    • University of Derby year 10 white working-class boys pilot programme

      Astley, Jo; University of Derby (FACE, 2019-07-03)