• Enhancing design learning through partnerships: the case of Joinedupdesign for Academies

      Butcher, John; Schaber, Friedemann; University of Northampton (HEA Art Design media subject centre, 2011)
      This case study describes a partnership between the University of Northampton and the Sorrell Foundation’s Joinedupdesign for Academies programme, a pilot scheme aimed at informing the transition of struggling secondary (11-18) schools into re-designed and re-built academies. 12 second year undergraduate Design students participated, working closely with pupils at two secondary schools in Bedfordshire. We explored impact on student learning for employability and undergraduate learning with pupils as clients, as well as the challenge of working with multiple partners including schools. We report Joinedupdesign for Academies as a new model of off-campus learning.
    • Enhancing professional self-esteem: learners’ journeys on a distance-learning Doctorate in Education (EdD)

      Butcher, John; Sieminski, Sandy; University of Northampton; Open University (University of Northampton, 2009)
      This article explores the motivations, experiences and perceived outcomes for Doctorate in Education (EdD) students in their journey through a relatively new form of doctoral education at a distance. The research draws on a range of individual EdD participant voices, both student and graduate, and is timely in focusing on an example of an under-researched but increasingly common phenomenon of part-time distance learning professional doctorates. The aims of the research were: to understand what motivated students to register for an EdD; to explore the factors which successfully sustained them on their journey; to identify common outcomes on completion. The researchers developed a case study of the student EdD journey in its distinctive professional context(s). Data was collected in a number of linked stages including postal surveys, semi-structured interviews, and students’ reflective evaluations at different points. Key themes related to professional postgraduate learner transitions emerge from the data, which contrast with previous work on the traditional PhD and relate to: the deliberate choice by students of a part-time distance learning route; a broader and better-informed understanding of professional outcomes on a professionally-oriented doctorate; the value of flexible support systems for EdD students working in demanding educational roles.
    • From Lampitt to libraries: formulating state standards to embed information literacy across colleges

      DaCosta, Jacqui; Dubicki, Eleonora; Georgian Court University; Monmouth University (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012)
      In September 2007, the Lampitt Law was passed in the state of New Jersey, formalizing the requirements for students transferring between institutions. This led to a 2008 statewide articulation agreement to facilitate the seamless transfer of students’ courses and credits between county colleges and four-year public institutions of higher education. In response to this articulation agreement, three professional librarian groups combined to create information literacy standards utilizing progression as a core principle. The Information Literacy Progression Standards were launched in January 2010. They consist of a four-page document comprising an introduction; the standards defining competencies at a Novice/Introductory (Year 1) level and at a Gateway/Developing (Year 2) level; and some sample assignments demonstrating the Standards in Practice. This article outlines how the Standards were developed and successfully disseminated and implemented. As well as describing the creation of the Standards, the article highlights initiatives at several academic institutions where librarians have attempted to address information literacy at an organizational level, utilizing successful collaborations with faculty and administrators..
    • HIgh attaining pupils programme

      Astley, Jo; University of Derby (FACE, 2019-05-07)
    • How might inclusive approaches to assessment enhance student learning in HE?

      Butcher, John; Sedgwick, Paul; Lazard, Lisa; Hey, Jayne; University of Northampton (University of Northampton, 2010)
      This article reports some of the results from an investigation into issues around inclusivity in assessment undertaken at the University of Northampton (2009-2010). The Assess4success research project was conducted within a framework provided by the Higher Education Academy Summit programme on inclusive learning and teaching, and sought to explore the extent to which inclusivity, (a high level commitment in the university’s access and teaching policies), was embedded in students’ experiences of assessment. Drawing on internal quantitative data across the institution suggesting specific groups were more likely to struggle with summative assessment in Year 1, and qualitative data exploring sample student experiences in relation to formative assessment tasks, a series of generic recommendations to enhance the inclusivity of assessment practice both in the host institution and across the sector are offered.
    • Impact assessment in higher education : A strategic view from the UK.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby; University of Derby Derby United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Emerald, 2018-01-08)
      This article focuses on the importance of impact in higher education from a strategic perspective, exploring its value to institutions, learners and prospective students in today’s higher education context, using the UK as a case study. The increasing prominence of impact in HEPs is discussed, with consideration given to the operational structures and approaches which can be adopted to enable the monitoring and evaluation of impact in higher education providers.
    • The impact of a Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education on university lecturers appointed for their professional expertise at a teaching-led university: 'It's made me braver'.

      Butcher, John; Stoncel, D.; University of Derby; University of Northampton (Routledge, 2011-11-23)
      This article explores the impact of a Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education (PG Cert.) on new lecturers, appointed for their professional expertise. It focuses on staff perceptions of acculturation into the discourses of university learning and teaching. Drawing on a literature review which reveals (at best) ambivalent evidence of impact, the authors developed a case study investigating impact on staff changing careers into university teaching on the basis of their professional expertise. The data reveal positive outcomes, including the transition into confident and competent HE professionals.
    • The impacts and benefits of employing a progressive and sustained approach to outreach programmes for universities: a case study – the progress to success framework

      Bainham, Krisha; University of Derby (FACE: Forum for Access and Continuing Education, 2019-07)
      The East Midlands is a social mobility cold spot with limited life chances and GCSE attainment well below the national average. The University of Derby’s Progress to Success Framework - targeting secondary schools in disadvantaged areas of Derby city and Derbyshire - has been developed in response to government concerns around widening the participation in higher education (HE) of under-represented learners. It is a long-term outreach initiative aimed at raising the aspiration, awareness and attainment cohorts of learners through a multi-intervention approach creating ‘drip feed’ touchpoints from Year 7 through to Year 11. Initiatives such as the National Collaborative Outreach Programme (NCOP) and Derby Opportunity Area (OA), plus research into sector best practice and ‘what works’ inform the framework, through which we offer activity which is engaging, interactive and informative. Robust evaluation and reflection is embedded throughout the framework using a logic model to map out success and impact measures to ensure effectiveness. A mixed methodology is employed, including individual activity feedback; teacher evaluation; multi-point surveys; focus groups; and tracking progress against predicted grades. This paper explores the benefits and challenges of delivering sustained outreach, and measuring the longitudinal impact on learners, in a rapidly changing political landscape, which is often times characterised by short-term funding streams and responding to continuous change in government measures. It puts forward an often overlooked practitioner viewpoint and illustrates how outreach professionals can ensure programmes encompass activity that is ultimately deliverable, whilst also being reactive to policy and creating a valid body of impact evidence.
    • The institutional repository and the library catalogue: adventures in data conversion.

      Rimmer, Sally; University of Derby (CILIP, the Library and Information Association, 2018-12)
    • Is there an information literacy skills gap to be bridged? An examination of faculty perceptions and activities relating to information literacy in the United States and England.

      DaCosta, Jacqui; College of New Jersey (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2010-05)
      Surveys of faculty were conducted at two higher education institutions in England and the United States to ascertain their perceptions of information literacy. Faculty were also asked about the extent to which they incorporated information literacy skills into their courses. Similarities were found across the two institutions both in the importance that faculty attached to information skills and what they actually did to incorporate the skills within curricula. The results reflect an information literacy skills gap between what faculty (and librarians) want for their students and the practical reality. Librarians and faculty should work collaboratively together to bridge this gap.
    • 'It was noticeable so I changed': Supergirls, aspirations and Bourdieu.

      Bowers-Brown, Tamsin; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018-11-01)
    • Lecturing, working with groups and providing individual support.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014-08-14)
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making and continuing best practice in academic libraries

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-03-31)
      HE/FE institutions are increasingly user focused and must meet the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of its users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political- and sector-wide institutional need to better account for and spend library budgets. This session will discuss how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to determine how effectively library resources are managed and planned, collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making for collection management.

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-07-20)
      Universities face the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political and sector-wide institutional need to manage and better account for library budgets. This talk will focus on how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to manage and plan library resources effectively; collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Off-campus learning and employability in undergraduate design: the Sorrell Young Design project as an innovative partnership

      Butcher, John; University of Northampton (Intellect, 2008)
      This article reports on research which explored the opportunity for extra-curricular undergraduate learning afforded by the Young Design Project (YDP), aimed at bringing together HE Design students, industry and schools. The research was undertaken in the context of the importance attached to ‘employability’ as a key driver for recent policy developments in Higher Education (see Leitch review and Cox report), as well as the political importance of Widening Participation initiatives between HEIs and schools. This research investigated the second iteration of the YDP in 2007, with 32 undergraduate students from two design degrees at University College Falmouth (BA Graphic Design and BA Spatial Design) on a project based in four Cornish schools (three secondary, one primary). The research sought to answer the question: what do undergraduate students learn from working with pupils as clients and industry practitioners in the context of a school-based project? This question is explored through a case study drawing on four triangulated phases of data collection: desk research of relevant policy documentation; pre-project semi-structured questionnaire; post-project focus group interviews and individual face-to-face interviews with key gatekeepers. As well as reflecting on the opportunity to engage with innovative learning in design, the findings offer fruitful insights to HE practitioners and policy makers considering issues around off-campus learning. This research recommends notions of ‘employability’ be subject to greater scrutiny in HE policy, since a key finding from this research is the crucial importance of appropriately resourced authentic project partnerships for deep and worthwhile undergraduate learning to take place.
    • Rejuvenating UDEL

      Boland, Jill; University of Derby (2010-03)
      Abstract The purpose of my poster is to illustrate the development of a number of resources designed to aid in the learning and teaching of information skills, either as part of a skills session in the library or pc lab, or as part of self-directed study. It will highlight the aims of the Information Skills project team at the University of Derby, along with a timeline for the project to the present day. Included will be information on the tutorials currently completed using the Adobe Captivate software, with screenshots of same to show some of the creative standards agreed upon. As a starting point for the project we used the library catalogue as the 'test' piece which was trialled among the student body, feedback from which led to the consolidation of the standards employed in all demonstrations as well as to modifications to the original example tutorial. Examples of some of the questions asked during the trial will be included on the poster to illustrate what feedback we were looking for. The poster will also include projections for the future, highlighting the directions in which we look to take the project as it becomes incorporated into the daily work of subject librarians at the University. It will also indicate how we plan to measure the impact of these resources on the student experience and use the subsequent feedback to further develop and improve those resources for the future. Handouts detailing key points from the poster will be available for colleagues to take away with them, and if possible a demonstration of one of the tutorials will also take place. Two of the tutorials are publically available without VLE access and those links will be included on the handout for colleagues to look at in their own time.
    • So you didn't get your Hogwarts letter: engaging muggles in the library experience

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
      The poster details the stages of the library's ongoing audio tour projects using the Aurasma augmented reality app.
    • The strategic perspective.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-31)