• A collaborative approach

      Kay, James; University of Derby (JISC, 2014-04-18)
      James Kay, Library Subscriptions & Document Delivery Librarian at the University of Derby, makes the case for a collaborative approach to planning and decision making amongst HE/FE library and information practitioners.
    • Curriculum-based library assessment at De Montfort University

      Cavanagh, Paul; De Montfort University (2012-05-22)
    • A day in the life of a subscriptions and document delivery librarian

      Kay, James; University of Derby (Ubiquity Press, 2016-07-05)
      In his role as part of the Learning Resources Development & Delivery team at the University of Derby, James Kay shares responsibility for acquisitions, serials, e-resources, inter-library loans, online reading lists, copyright and cataloguing.
    • Developing students' information and research skills via Blackboard

      DaCosta, Jacqui; Jones, Becky; College of New Jersey; Loughborough University (2007)
      This paper summarizes work undertaken at De Montfort University (Leicester, UK) to develop students’ information and research skills using the Blackboard Virtual Learning Environment. It outlines how a traditionally delivered and assessed program was reviewed and revised in order to produce a blended learning experience for students. The librarians involved undertook this project with students from the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences during March/April 2005, teaching two groups in parallel--one group using Blackboard and another using the traditional teaching method. Both groups were given a diagnostic evaluation to gauge their confidence levels with both information skills and using Blackboard, and to obtain their perceptions of their experiences. Both groups underwent a formal summative assessment with one group using Blackboard and the control group having a paper-based assignment. The Blackboard sessions were very popular with students and this method of teaching has subsequently been extended to other modules within the university. Students appeared to be more motivated and appreciated the constant availability of the learning materials. This project was the first example within the university of students undertaking a formal online assessment using Blackboard, and the librarians received a Curriculum Development and Innovation Award. The work was subsequently disseminated within the university, where it was well received
    • Is there an information literacy skills gap to be bridged? An examination of faculty perceptions and activities relating to information literacy in the United States and England.

      DaCosta, Jacqui; College of New Jersey (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2010-05)
      Surveys of faculty were conducted at two higher education institutions in England and the United States to ascertain their perceptions of information literacy. Faculty were also asked about the extent to which they incorporated information literacy skills into their courses. Similarities were found across the two institutions both in the importance that faculty attached to information skills and what they actually did to incorporate the skills within curricula. The results reflect an information literacy skills gap between what faculty (and librarians) want for their students and the practical reality. Librarians and faculty should work collaboratively together to bridge this gap.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making and continuing best practice in academic libraries

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-03-31)
      HE/FE institutions are increasingly user focused and must meet the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of its users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political- and sector-wide institutional need to better account for and spend library budgets. This session will discuss how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to determine how effectively library resources are managed and planned, collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making for collection management.

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-07-20)
      Universities face the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political and sector-wide institutional need to manage and better account for library budgets. This talk will focus on how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to manage and plan library resources effectively; collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • So you didn't get your Hogwarts letter: engaging muggles in the library experience

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
      The poster details the stages of the library's ongoing audio tour projects using the Aurasma augmented reality app.
    • A tale of two systems – Library Plus and Discover: EDS at the University of Derby

      Kay, James; Martindale, Graham; University of Derby (2016-07-06)
      In the autumn of 2013 the University of Derby Library launched Library Plus, our name for the EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS), aimed exclusively at HE students. The Library launched a second EDS tool named Discover in 2015, used by FE and Access Students attending our partner organisation Buxton & Leek College. As a member of the working team involved in the implementation of Discover, I had the opportunity to help set up, design and test a new EDS tool from scratch. This presentation will describe how Discover was created, the problems I encountered during implementation, and the successes and lessons I learnt from introducing EDS in an FE institution. Discover also presented the Library with new opportunities to look at the functionality of Library Plus, and how to promote it more effectively to our HE students. It also highlights the challenges of maintaining two similar, but altogether different EDS systems, for the needs of an increasingly diverse student body.