• Canoodling with careers: cross-team working in information literacy

      Carnegie, Maria; White, Jonathan; Vivian-Shaw, Vanessa; University of Derby (2014-04-24)
      This workshop will explore how support services can work together to deliver information literacy across an institution. Traditionally Librarians have collaborated solely with Academics to develop and deliver information literacy interventions and support for students, but Librarian teams are very often co-located in teams providing wider services. This can include working in professional teams encompassing careers and employability professionals, learning technologists, study skills/academic skills teachers and IT skills trainers. At University of Derby the Library service is part of the Institute for Learning Enhancement and Innovation, which encompasses all of these services. This workshop will build upon work done by the three presenters, who are based at the Buxton campus, to find linkages between the work of Library Academic Services team of Subject Librarians and the work done by the Careers Consultants. Working together, the presenters found that both teams were developing and delivering sessions around the same core set of digital and information literacy skills, but from different perspectives. This has led to the development and delivery of joint compulsory lectures and workshops, voluntary workshops, and a joint ‘roaming’ service to students based at the multiple sites around the town. Delivered as a workshop, this session will engage participants in a range of group work activities, including: ‘Identifying overlapping skills teaching within support teams’, ‘What makes teams work? How can diverse teams work together on IL?’ and ‘Discussion on issues and good practice sharing’. The first two of these activities will involve a group discussion and a mind mapping activity on the personality and cultural dimensions of working with members of others teams. The good practice sharing will take the form of a ‘speed dating’ style activity where participants move around the room gaining new ideas and passing on experiences. Attending this workshop will allow participants to share good practice and will benefit from identifying opportunities for cross-team working within their own institution. In addition they will gain ideas on how to approach members of other teams to facilitate information literacy projects.
    • So you didn't get your Hogwarts letter: engaging muggles in the library experience

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
      The poster details the stages of the library's ongoing audio tour projects using the Aurasma augmented reality app.
    • Think global, collaborate local: cross-team working to develop students' employability skills

      White, Jonathan; Balder, Mikaela; University of Derby (2014-06-16)
      This presentation gives the background to a small project undertaken at the Buxton campus. The project was aimed at final year students, as a way to enable them to turn the 'academic' skills developed at University into skills they can utilise in the workplace. This idea for an 'outduction' event allowed for different student-facing support teams to work together. This presentation shows how two of those services, the Library and the International Student Centre, identified crossover between information literacy skills and the attributes required of 'global graduates'.
    • Wiki literacy: using Wikipedia as a teaching tool

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (LILAC conference, 2019-04)
      Wikipedia has traditionally been viewed with scepticism in higher education, and many academics discourage students from using it at all – a position borne out by our own internal sample of Derby academics. However, statistics show that Wikipedia is still one of the top five most heavily used websites in the world. With this in mind therefore, subject librarians at the University of Derby decided to try a different approach by using Wikipedia as a teaching and learning tool rather than just a source of information. Working with the undergraduate Publishing programme, librarians and academic staff redeveloped an existing module on Content Development to be structured entirely around the use of Wikipedia. Students were set tasks to create new articles, copy edit existing ones, peer review each other’s articles, and research for articles missing citations, thereby developing their academic writing, information literacy and digital skills. An added benefit for Publishing students especially was the opportunity to create content for a worldwide audience, with a potential impact long beyond the usual assignment timeline. In this short presentation we will present on the evolution of this project, our collaborative work with Wikimedia UK and academic staff, and outcomes from the project, including feedback from students and future plans for wider use across the University.