• Canoodling with careers: cross-team working in information literacy

      Carnegie, Maria; White, Jonathan; Vivian-Shaw, Vanessa; University of Derby (2014-04-24)
      This workshop will explore how support services can work together to deliver information literacy across an institution. Traditionally Librarians have collaborated solely with Academics to develop and deliver information literacy interventions and support for students, but Librarian teams are very often co-located in teams providing wider services. This can include working in professional teams encompassing careers and employability professionals, learning technologists, study skills/academic skills teachers and IT skills trainers. At University of Derby the Library service is part of the Institute for Learning Enhancement and Innovation, which encompasses all of these services. This workshop will build upon work done by the three presenters, who are based at the Buxton campus, to find linkages between the work of Library Academic Services team of Subject Librarians and the work done by the Careers Consultants. Working together, the presenters found that both teams were developing and delivering sessions around the same core set of digital and information literacy skills, but from different perspectives. This has led to the development and delivery of joint compulsory lectures and workshops, voluntary workshops, and a joint ‘roaming’ service to students based at the multiple sites around the town. Delivered as a workshop, this session will engage participants in a range of group work activities, including: ‘Identifying overlapping skills teaching within support teams’, ‘What makes teams work? How can diverse teams work together on IL?’ and ‘Discussion on issues and good practice sharing’. The first two of these activities will involve a group discussion and a mind mapping activity on the personality and cultural dimensions of working with members of others teams. The good practice sharing will take the form of a ‘speed dating’ style activity where participants move around the room gaining new ideas and passing on experiences. Attending this workshop will allow participants to share good practice and will benefit from identifying opportunities for cross-team working within their own institution. In addition they will gain ideas on how to approach members of other teams to facilitate information literacy projects.
    • A collaborative approach

      Kay, James; University of Derby (JISC, 2014-04-18)
      James Kay, Library Subscriptions & Document Delivery Librarian at the University of Derby, makes the case for a collaborative approach to planning and decision making amongst HE/FE library and information practitioners.
    • Contextualised approaches to widening participation: a comparative case study of two UK universities

      Butcher, John; Corfield, Rohini; Rose-Adams, John; University of Derby; University of Northampton; Open University (The Open University/, 2012-01)
      This article reports on institutional research at two contrasting UK universities, each with different foci in relation to widening participation (WP). The researchers sought to explore senior staff perspectives on the WP agenda at a time of unprecedented uncertainty and turmoil in the UK higher education sector. The research consisted primarily of interview data from university leaders responsible strategically for WP activity. The findings offer a nuanced narrative of the policy and practice of widening participation at two contrasting universities. Researchers found that the WP discourse itself is perceived as confused and discredited. Viewing ‘widening participation students’ as a homogenised group risks both the benefits of differentiated responses through discipline or subject areas and the benefits of more student-centred measures of success.
    • A day in the life of a subscriptions and document delivery librarian

      Kay, James; University of Derby (Ubiquity Press, 2016-07-05)
      In his role as part of the Learning Resources Development & Delivery team at the University of Derby, James Kay shares responsibility for acquisitions, serials, e-resources, inter-library loans, online reading lists, copyright and cataloguing.
    • Defining delivery (@Derby): upgrading support for online learners

      Butler, Emma; Ayre, Lucy; DaCosta, Jacqui; University of Derby (2016-03-22)
      Online learning at the University of Derby has grown in leaps and bounds over the last few years. As this form of learning has advanced, so has the support from the Library to help develop information and digitally literate students. This short paper will outline the key milestones and on-going support initiatives that characterise an effective collaboration across the University.
    • Defining the nature of blended learning through its depiction in current research

      Smith, Karen; Hill, John; University of Derby; University of Hertfordshire (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-18)
      Blended learning has been a feature of higher education practice and research for almost two decades. This article takes stock of current blended learning research, contributing to the growing number of meta-analyses of higher education and blended learning research more generally, through a review of ninety-seven articles relating to blended learning in higher education published in fifteen journals between 2012 and mid-2017. The review focused on where and when the articles were published; their provenance, scale, scope; methodological approach; the broad research themes; and definition of blended learning used. The review shows that despite its ubiquity, blended learning’s definition is all-encompassing; its spread is global but research is dominated by key players; it is of technical interest; and its research is small-scale, individually focused, seeking to evidence the benefits of blended learning. The article concludes with recommendations of how higher education research could provide institutions with evidence to ensure their ‘best of blends’.
    • The didactic diamond - An information literacy model to explain the academic process in higher education.

      Zijlstra, Tim R.; University of Derby (LILAC Conference, 2018-04-06)
      The foundation for the Didactic Diamond was developed with students of the College of Health and Social Care at the University of Derby – in particular the Chesterfield Campus. A significant number of students are so-called atypical learners (ie. returners to education or non-traditional learners) which led to an identified need to provide more robust study skill guidance. Roberts and Ousey (2011) described "finding and using evidence" as the "bane of student life" in relation to student nurses. The Didactic Diamond seeks to ease this problem by introducing students to the process involved with producing good quality academic work. It is used to explain the process from understanding the question and choosing an appropriate topic; utilising information literacy to find appropriate sources; taking notes on the found evidence to gain critical understanding of the topic; using drafting techniques to improve the academic writing and ensuring that the original question is answered fully and critically by utilising the developed resources diligently. Feedback from students on the Didactic Diamond has been positive, the simple figure acts as a mnemonic and provides students with an introduction to the method with a means to remember which steps to take in their academic process. After utilising the Diamond in one-to-one sessions it has been developed into an Academic Writing session for the University Library’s Enhance Your Learning program and has been successfully delivered to a range of students from different cohorts. The Masterclass provides an opportunity to share the Didactic Diamond with a broader audience interested in Information Literacy and embedding Information Literacy in a broader procedural context.
    • HIgh attaining pupils programme

      Astley, Jo; University of Derby (FACE, 2019-05-07)
    • Impact assessment in higher education : A strategic view from the UK.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby; University of Derby Derby United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Emerald, 2018-01-08)
      This article focuses on the importance of impact in higher education from a strategic perspective, exploring its value to institutions, learners and prospective students in today’s higher education context, using the UK as a case study. The increasing prominence of impact in HEPs is discussed, with consideration given to the operational structures and approaches which can be adopted to enable the monitoring and evaluation of impact in higher education providers.
    • The impact of a Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education on university lecturers appointed for their professional expertise at a teaching-led university: 'It's made me braver'.

      Butcher, John; Stoncel, D.; University of Derby; University of Northampton (Routledge, 2011-11-23)
      This article explores the impact of a Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education (PG Cert.) on new lecturers, appointed for their professional expertise. It focuses on staff perceptions of acculturation into the discourses of university learning and teaching. Drawing on a literature review which reveals (at best) ambivalent evidence of impact, the authors developed a case study investigating impact on staff changing careers into university teaching on the basis of their professional expertise. The data reveal positive outcomes, including the transition into confident and competent HE professionals.
    • The impacts and benefits of employing a progressive and sustained approach to outreach programmes for universities: a case study – the progress to success framework

      Bainham, Krisha; University of Derby (FACE: Forum for Access and Continuing Education, 2019-07)
      The East Midlands is a social mobility cold spot with limited life chances and GCSE attainment well below the national average. The University of Derby’s Progress to Success Framework - targeting secondary schools in disadvantaged areas of Derby city and Derbyshire - has been developed in response to government concerns around widening the participation in higher education (HE) of under-represented learners. It is a long-term outreach initiative aimed at raising the aspiration, awareness and attainment cohorts of learners through a multi-intervention approach creating ‘drip feed’ touchpoints from Year 7 through to Year 11. Initiatives such as the National Collaborative Outreach Programme (NCOP) and Derby Opportunity Area (OA), plus research into sector best practice and ‘what works’ inform the framework, through which we offer activity which is engaging, interactive and informative. Robust evaluation and reflection is embedded throughout the framework using a logic model to map out success and impact measures to ensure effectiveness. A mixed methodology is employed, including individual activity feedback; teacher evaluation; multi-point surveys; focus groups; and tracking progress against predicted grades. This paper explores the benefits and challenges of delivering sustained outreach, and measuring the longitudinal impact on learners, in a rapidly changing political landscape, which is often times characterised by short-term funding streams and responding to continuous change in government measures. It puts forward an often overlooked practitioner viewpoint and illustrates how outreach professionals can ensure programmes encompass activity that is ultimately deliverable, whilst also being reactive to policy and creating a valid body of impact evidence.
    • The institutional repository and the library catalogue: adventures in data conversion.

      Rimmer, Sally; University of Derby (CILIP, the Library and Information Association, 2018-12)
    • 'It was noticeable so I changed': Supergirls, aspirations and Bourdieu.

      Bowers-Brown, Tamsin; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018-11-01)
    • Lecturing, working with groups and providing individual support.

      Ayres, Ruth L.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014-08-14)
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making and continuing best practice in academic libraries

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-03-31)
      HE/FE institutions are increasingly user focused and must meet the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of its users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political- and sector-wide institutional need to better account for and spend library budgets. This session will discuss how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to determine how effectively library resources are managed and planned, collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Manage, develop, collaborate: Evidence-based decision making for collection management.

      Kay, James; Cavanagh, Paul; University of Derby (2015-07-20)
      Universities face the challenge of providing high quality services which meet the demands of users to provide access to more varied resources in a rapidly changing technological environment. This is balanced against the increasing costs of resources and a political and sector-wide institutional need to manage and better account for library budgets. This talk will focus on how the University of Derby is using statistical and decision-based tools to manage and plan library resources effectively; collaborating with publishers, academics, colleagues within the Library and across the library and information sector to develop continuing best practice through evidence-based decision making.
    • Mentoring as an intervention to promote gender equality in academic medicine: a systematic review

      House, Allan; Dracup, Naila; Burkinshaw, Paula; Ward, Vicky; Bryant, Louise D; University of Leeds; University of Derby; University of St Andrews (BMJ, 2021-01-26)
      Mentoring is frequently suggested as an intervention to address gender inequalities in the workplace. To systematically review evidence published since a definitive review in 2006 on the effectiveness of mentoring interventions aimed at achieving gender equality in academic medicine. Systematic Review, using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication as a template for data extraction and synthesis. Studies were included if they described a specific mentoring intervention in a medical school or analogous academic healthcare organisation and included results from an evaluation of the intervention. Mentoring was defined as (1) a formally organised intervention entailing a supportive relationship between a mentor, defined as a more senior/experienced person and a mentee defined as a more junior/inexperienced person; (2) mentoring intervention involved academic career support (3) the mentoring relationship was outside line management or supervision of performance and was defined by contact over an extended period of time. The impact of mentoring was usually reported at the level of individual participants, for example, satisfaction and well-being or self-reported career progression. We sought evidence of impact on gender equality via reports of organisation-level effectiveness, of promotion or retention, pay and academic performance of female staff. We identified 32 publications: 8 review articles, 20 primary observational studies and 4 randomised controlled trials. A further 19 discussed mentoring in relation to gender but did not meet our eligibility criteria. The terminology used, and the structures and processes reported as constituting mentoring, varied greatly. We identified that mentoring is popular with many who receive it; however, we found no robust evidence of effectiveness in reducing gender inequalities. Primary research used weak evaluation designs. Mentoring is a complex intervention. Future evaluations should adopt standardised approaches used in applied health research to the design and evaluation of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.
    • Rejuvenating UDEL

      Boland, Jill; University of Derby (2010-03)
      Abstract The purpose of my poster is to illustrate the development of a number of resources designed to aid in the learning and teaching of information skills, either as part of a skills session in the library or pc lab, or as part of self-directed study. It will highlight the aims of the Information Skills project team at the University of Derby, along with a timeline for the project to the present day. Included will be information on the tutorials currently completed using the Adobe Captivate software, with screenshots of same to show some of the creative standards agreed upon. As a starting point for the project we used the library catalogue as the 'test' piece which was trialled among the student body, feedback from which led to the consolidation of the standards employed in all demonstrations as well as to modifications to the original example tutorial. Examples of some of the questions asked during the trial will be included on the poster to illustrate what feedback we were looking for. The poster will also include projections for the future, highlighting the directions in which we look to take the project as it becomes incorporated into the daily work of subject librarians at the University. It will also indicate how we plan to measure the impact of these resources on the student experience and use the subsequent feedback to further develop and improve those resources for the future. Handouts detailing key points from the poster will be available for colleagues to take away with them, and if possible a demonstration of one of the tutorials will also take place. Two of the tutorials are publically available without VLE access and those links will be included on the handout for colleagues to look at in their own time.
    • So you didn't get your Hogwarts letter: engaging muggles in the library experience

      Ball, Caroline; White, Jonathan; University of Derby (2017-04-10)
      The poster details the stages of the library's ongoing audio tour projects using the Aurasma augmented reality app.