• Defining delivery (@Derby): upgrading support for online learners

      Butler, Emma; Ayre, Lucy; DaCosta, Jacqui; University of Derby (2016-03-22)
      Online learning at the University of Derby has grown in leaps and bounds over the last few years. As this form of learning has advanced, so has the support from the Library to help develop information and digitally literate students. This short paper will outline the key milestones and on-going support initiatives that characterise an effective collaboration across the University.
    • Developing students' information and research skills via Blackboard

      DaCosta, Jacqui; Jones, Becky; College of New Jersey; Loughborough University (2007)
      This paper summarizes work undertaken at De Montfort University (Leicester, UK) to develop students’ information and research skills using the Blackboard Virtual Learning Environment. It outlines how a traditionally delivered and assessed program was reviewed and revised in order to produce a blended learning experience for students. The librarians involved undertook this project with students from the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences during March/April 2005, teaching two groups in parallel--one group using Blackboard and another using the traditional teaching method. Both groups were given a diagnostic evaluation to gauge their confidence levels with both information skills and using Blackboard, and to obtain their perceptions of their experiences. Both groups underwent a formal summative assessment with one group using Blackboard and the control group having a paper-based assignment. The Blackboard sessions were very popular with students and this method of teaching has subsequently been extended to other modules within the university. Students appeared to be more motivated and appreciated the constant availability of the learning materials. This project was the first example within the university of students undertaking a formal online assessment using Blackboard, and the librarians received a Curriculum Development and Innovation Award. The work was subsequently disseminated within the university, where it was well received
    • From Lampitt to libraries: formulating state standards to embed information literacy across colleges

      DaCosta, Jacqui; Dubicki, Eleonora; Georgian Court University; Monmouth University (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012)
      In September 2007, the Lampitt Law was passed in the state of New Jersey, formalizing the requirements for students transferring between institutions. This led to a 2008 statewide articulation agreement to facilitate the seamless transfer of students’ courses and credits between county colleges and four-year public institutions of higher education. In response to this articulation agreement, three professional librarian groups combined to create information literacy standards utilizing progression as a core principle. The Information Literacy Progression Standards were launched in January 2010. They consist of a four-page document comprising an introduction; the standards defining competencies at a Novice/Introductory (Year 1) level and at a Gateway/Developing (Year 2) level; and some sample assignments demonstrating the Standards in Practice. This article outlines how the Standards were developed and successfully disseminated and implemented. As well as describing the creation of the Standards, the article highlights initiatives at several academic institutions where librarians have attempted to address information literacy at an organizational level, utilizing successful collaborations with faculty and administrators..
    • Is there an information literacy skills gap to be bridged? An examination of faculty perceptions and activities relating to information literacy in the United States and England.

      DaCosta, Jacqui; College of New Jersey (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2010-05)
      Surveys of faculty were conducted at two higher education institutions in England and the United States to ascertain their perceptions of information literacy. Faculty were also asked about the extent to which they incorporated information literacy skills into their courses. Similarities were found across the two institutions both in the importance that faculty attached to information skills and what they actually did to incorporate the skills within curricula. The results reflect an information literacy skills gap between what faculty (and librarians) want for their students and the practical reality. Librarians and faculty should work collaboratively together to bridge this gap.