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dc.contributor.authorMontero-Marín, Jesús
dc.contributor.authorNavarro-Gil, Mayte
dc.contributor.authorPuebla-Guedea, Marta
dc.contributor.authorLuciano, Juan V.
dc.contributor.authorVan Gordon, William
dc.contributor.authorShonin, Edo
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Campayo, Javier
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-09T16:32:18Z
dc.date.available2018-02-09T16:32:18Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-16
dc.identifier.citationMontero-Marín, J., Navarro-Gil, M., Puebla, M., Luciana, J. V., Van Gordon, W., Shonin, E., & García-Campayo, J. (2017). Efficacy of ‘Attachment-Based Compassion Therapy’ in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled trial. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 8, 307, DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2017.00307.en
dc.identifier.issn16640640
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyt.2017.00307
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622121
dc.description.abstractObjective: There is a growing interest in evaluating the effectiveness of compassion interventions for treating psychological disorders. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of “attachment-based compassion therapy” (ABCT) in the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), and the role of psychological flexibility as a mediator of improvements. Methods: A total of 42 patients with FM were randomly assigned to ABCT or relaxation (active control group). Both the intervention and control condition were combined with treatment as usual (TAU). The primary outcome was functional status (FIQ), and the secondary outcomes were clinical severity (CGI-S), pain catastrophizing (PCS), anxiety (HADS-A), depression (HADS-D), quality of life (EQ-5D), and psychological flexibility (AAQ-II). Differences between the groups were estimated using mixed-effects models, and mediation assessments were conducted using path analyses. Results: The ABCT group demonstrated superior outcomes compared to the relaxation group, including better FIQ values after treatment (B = −3.01; p = 0.003). Differences in FIQ were maintained at 3-month follow-up (B = −3.33; p = 0.001). The absolute risk reduction in ABCT compared to relaxation increased by 40.0%, with an NNT = 3 based on criteria of ≥50% FIQ reduction after treatment. Psychological flexibility had a significant mediating effect on improvements. Conclusion: These results suggest that ABCT combined with TAU appears to be effective in the treatment of FM symptoms.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe project received funding from the Network for Prevention and Health Promotion in Primary Care (RD12/0005/0001) grant from the Instituto de Salud Carlos III of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness and was co-financed with European Union ERDF funds.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiersen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyt.2017.00307/fullen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Frontiers in Psychiatryen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectFibromyalgiaen
dc.titleEfficacy of “attachment-based compassion therapy” in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled trial.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPrimary Care Prevention and Health Promotion Research Networken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Zaragozaen
dc.contributor.departmentSant Joan de Deu Health Parken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentAwake to Wisdom Centre for Meditation and Mindfulness Researchen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Psychiatryen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:34:17Z
html.description.abstractObjective: There is a growing interest in evaluating the effectiveness of compassion interventions for treating psychological disorders. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of “attachment-based compassion therapy” (ABCT) in the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), and the role of psychological flexibility as a mediator of improvements. Methods: A total of 42 patients with FM were randomly assigned to ABCT or relaxation (active control group). Both the intervention and control condition were combined with treatment as usual (TAU). The primary outcome was functional status (FIQ), and the secondary outcomes were clinical severity (CGI-S), pain catastrophizing (PCS), anxiety (HADS-A), depression (HADS-D), quality of life (EQ-5D), and psychological flexibility (AAQ-II). Differences between the groups were estimated using mixed-effects models, and mediation assessments were conducted using path analyses. Results: The ABCT group demonstrated superior outcomes compared to the relaxation group, including better FIQ values after treatment (B = −3.01; p = 0.003). Differences in FIQ were maintained at 3-month follow-up (B = −3.33; p = 0.001). The absolute risk reduction in ABCT compared to relaxation increased by 40.0%, with an NNT = 3 based on criteria of ≥50% FIQ reduction after treatment. Psychological flexibility had a significant mediating effect on improvements. Conclusion: These results suggest that ABCT combined with TAU appears to be effective in the treatment of FM symptoms.


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