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dc.contributor.authorChoudhry, Rizwan Saeed
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Kamran A.
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Sohaib Z.
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Muhammad A.
dc.contributor.authorHassan, Abid
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-09T15:00:32Z
dc.date.available2018-02-09T15:00:32Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-26
dc.identifier.citationChoudhry, R. S. et al (2016) 'Micromechanical modeling of 8-harness satin weave glass fiber-reinforced composites', Journal of Composite Materials, 51 (5):705.en
dc.identifier.issn00219983
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0021998316649782
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622113
dc.description.abstractThis study introduces a unit cell (UC) based finite element (FE) micromechanical model that accounts for correct post cure fabric geometry, in-situ material properties and void content within the composite to accurately predict the effective elastic orthotropic properties of 8-harness satin weave glass fiber reinforced phenolic (GFRP) composites. The micromechanical model utilizes a correct post cure internal architecture of weave, which was obtained through X-ray microtomography (XMT) tests. Moreover, it utilizes an analytical expression to up-date the input material properties to account for in-situ effects of resin distribution within yarn (the yarn volume fraction) and void content on yarn and matrix properties. This is generally not considered in modeling approaches available in literature and in particular, it has not been demonstrated before for FE micromechanics models of 8-harness satin weave composites. The UC method is used to obtain the effective responses by applying periodic boundary conditions. The outcome of the analysis based on the proposed model is validated through experiments. After validation, the micromechanical model was further utilized to predict the unknown effective properties of the same composite.
dc.description.sponsorshipDFID UK through DELPHE 780en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0021998316649782en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Composite Materialsen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectMicromechanical modelen
dc.subject8-harness satin weaveen
dc.subjectX-ray tomographyen
dc.subjectFinite element modellingen
dc.subjectCompositesen
dc.titleMicromechanical modeling of 8-harness satin weave glass fiber-reinforced composites.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1530793X
dc.contributor.departmentCapital University of Sciences and Technologyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Manchesteren
dc.contributor.departmentNational University of Science and Technologyen
dc.contributor.departmentKhalifa University of Science and Technologyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Composite Materialsen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:33:29Z
html.description.abstractThis study introduces a unit cell (UC) based finite element (FE) micromechanical model that accounts for correct post cure fabric geometry, in-situ material properties and void content within the composite to accurately predict the effective elastic orthotropic properties of 8-harness satin weave glass fiber reinforced phenolic (GFRP) composites. The micromechanical model utilizes a correct post cure internal architecture of weave, which was obtained through X-ray microtomography (XMT) tests. Moreover, it utilizes an analytical expression to up-date the input material properties to account for in-situ effects of resin distribution within yarn (the yarn volume fraction) and void content on yarn and matrix properties. This is generally not considered in modeling approaches available in literature and in particular, it has not been demonstrated before for FE micromechanics models of 8-harness satin weave composites. The UC method is used to obtain the effective responses by applying periodic boundary conditions. The outcome of the analysis based on the proposed model is validated through experiments. After validation, the micromechanical model was further utilized to predict the unknown effective properties of the same composite.


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