Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFalconer, Caroline J.
dc.contributor.authorRovira, Aitor
dc.contributor.authorKing, John A.
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorAntley, Angus
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Pasco
dc.contributor.authorRalph, Neil
dc.contributor.authorSlater, Mel
dc.contributor.authorBrewin, Chris R.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-09T12:13:04Z
dc.date.available2018-02-09T12:13:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-02
dc.identifier.citationFalconer, C. J. et al (2016) 'Embodying self-compassion within virtual reality and its effects on patients with depression, BJPsych Open, 2 (01):74.en
dc.identifier.issn20564724
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjpo.bp.115.002147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622106
dc.description.abstractBackground Self-criticism is a ubiquitous feature of psychopathology and can be combatted by increasing levels of self-compassion. However, some patients are resistant to self-compassion. Aims To investigate whether the effects of self-identification with virtual bodies within immersive virtual reality could be exploited to increase self-compassion in patients with depression. Method We developed an 8-minute scenario in which 15 patients practised delivering compassion in one virtual body and then experienced receiving it from themselves in another virtual body. Results In an open trial, three repetitions of this scenario led to significant reductions in depression severity and self-criticism, as well as to a significant increase in self-compassion, from baseline to 4-week follow-up. Four patients showed clinically significant improvement. Conclusions The results indicate that interventions using immersive virtual reality may have considerable clinical potential and that further development of these methods preparatory to a controlled trial is now warranted.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S2056472400001186/type/journal_articleen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BJPsych Openen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectEmpathyen
dc.subjectPerspective talkingen
dc.subjectSelf-criticismen
dc.subjectShameen
dc.subjectVirtual Realityen
dc.titleEmbodying self-compassion within virtual reality and its effects on patients with depression.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Barcelonaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalBJPsych Openen
dc.dateAccepted2015-12-21
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-12-21
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:33:12Z
html.description.abstractBackground Self-criticism is a ubiquitous feature of psychopathology and can be combatted by increasing levels of self-compassion. However, some patients are resistant to self-compassion. Aims To investigate whether the effects of self-identification with virtual bodies within immersive virtual reality could be exploited to increase self-compassion in patients with depression. Method We developed an 8-minute scenario in which 15 patients practised delivering compassion in one virtual body and then experienced receiving it from themselves in another virtual body. Results In an open trial, three repetitions of this scenario led to significant reductions in depression severity and self-criticism, as well as to a significant increase in self-compassion, from baseline to 4-week follow-up. Four patients showed clinically significant improvement. Conclusions The results indicate that interventions using immersive virtual reality may have considerable clinical potential and that further development of these methods preparatory to a controlled trial is now warranted.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Gilbert_2018_embodying_selfcom ...
Size:
103.8Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Published PDF (Open Access CCBY)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Archived with thanks to BJPsych Open
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Archived with thanks to BJPsych Open