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dc.contributor.authorOkere, Uchechukwu V.
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, Jasmin K.
dc.contributor.authorOgbonnaya, Uchenna O.
dc.contributor.authorJones, Kevin C.
dc.contributor.authorSemple, Kirk T.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-26T16:44:01Z
dc.date.available2018-01-26T16:44:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-04
dc.identifier.citationOkere, U. V. et al (2017) 'Indigenous 14C-phenanthrene biodegradation in “pristine” woodland and grassland soils from Norway and the United Kingdom', Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 19 (11):1437en
dc.identifier.issn20507887
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/C7EM00242D
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622083
dc.description.abstractIn this study, the indigenous microbial mineralisation of 14C-phenanthrene in seven background soils (four from Norwegian woodland and three from the UK (two grasslands and one woodland)) was investigated. ∑PAHs ranged from 16.39 to 285.54 ng g−1 dw soil. Lag phases (time before 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation reached 5%) were longer in all of the Norwegian soils and correlated positively with TOC, but negatively with ∑PAHs and phenanthrene degraders for all soils. 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation in the soils varied due to physicochemical properties. The results show that indigenous microorganisms can adapt to 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation following diffuse PAH contamination. Considering the potential of soil as a secondary PAH source, these findings highlight the important role of indigenous microflora in the processing of PAHs in the environment.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistryen
dc.relation.urlhttp://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2017/EM/C7EM00242D#!divAbstracten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Environmental Science: Processes & Impactsen
dc.subjectEnvironment scienceen
dc.subjectSoil analysisen
dc.subjectChemistryen
dc.subjectPolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbonsen
dc.titleIndigenous 14C-phenanthrene biodegradation in “pristine” woodland and grassland soils from Norway and the United Kingdom.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn20507895
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironment Canadaen
dc.contributor.departmentFederal University Oye-Ekitien
dc.contributor.departmentLancaster Universityen
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science: Processes & Impactsen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Derby
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironment Canada
dc.contributor.institutionFederal University Oye-Ekiti
dc.contributor.institutionLancaster University
dc.contributor.institutionLancaster University
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-09-28
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:31:19Z
html.description.abstractIn this study, the indigenous microbial mineralisation of 14C-phenanthrene in seven background soils (four from Norwegian woodland and three from the UK (two grasslands and one woodland)) was investigated. ∑PAHs ranged from 16.39 to 285.54 ng g−1 dw soil. Lag phases (time before 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation reached 5%) were longer in all of the Norwegian soils and correlated positively with TOC, but negatively with ∑PAHs and phenanthrene degraders for all soils. 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation in the soils varied due to physicochemical properties. The results show that indigenous microorganisms can adapt to 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation following diffuse PAH contamination. Considering the potential of soil as a secondary PAH source, these findings highlight the important role of indigenous microflora in the processing of PAHs in the environment.


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