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dc.contributor.authorBetts, Lucy R.
dc.contributor.authorSpenser, Karin A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-15T11:31:06Z
dc.date.available2018-01-15T11:31:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-12
dc.identifier.citationBetts, L. R. and Spenser, K. A. (2017) 'Developing the Cyber Victimization Experiences and Cyberbullying Behaviors Scales', The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 178 (3):147.en
dc.identifier.issn00221325
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00221325.2017.1295222
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622058
dc.description.abstractThe reported prevalence rates of cyber victimization experiences and cyberbullying behaviors vary. Part of this variation is likely due to the diverse definitions and operationalizations of the constructs adopted in previous research and the lack of psychometrically robust measures. Through 2 studies, the authors developed (Study 1) and evaluated (Study 2) the cyber victimization experiences and cyberbullying behaviors scales. Participants in Study 1 were 393 (122 boys, 171 girls) and in Study 2 were 345 (153 boys, 192 girls) 11–15-year-olds who completed measures of cyber victimization experiences, cyberbullying behaviors, face-to-face victimization experiences, face-to-face bullying behaviors, and social desirability. The 3-factor cyber victimization experiences scale comprised threat, shared images, and personal attack. The 3-factor cyberbullying behaviors scale comprised sharing images, gossip, and personal attack. Both scales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency and convergent validity.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00221325.2017.1295222en
dc.relation.urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622058
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of Genetic Psychologyen
dc.subjectCyberbullyingen
dc.subjectCyber victimizationen
dc.subjectBullyingen
dc.subjectSocial desirabilityen
dc.subjectScale developmenten
dc.titleDeveloping the cyber victimization experiences and cyberbullying behaviors scales.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn19400896
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Genetic Psychologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-01-30
html.description.abstractThe reported prevalence rates of cyber victimization experiences and cyberbullying behaviors vary. Part of this variation is likely due to the diverse definitions and operationalizations of the constructs adopted in previous research and the lack of psychometrically robust measures. Through 2 studies, the authors developed (Study 1) and evaluated (Study 2) the cyber victimization experiences and cyberbullying behaviors scales. Participants in Study 1 were 393 (122 boys, 171 girls) and in Study 2 were 345 (153 boys, 192 girls) 11–15-year-olds who completed measures of cyber victimization experiences, cyberbullying behaviors, face-to-face victimization experiences, face-to-face bullying behaviors, and social desirability. The 3-factor cyber victimization experiences scale comprised threat, shared images, and personal attack. The 3-factor cyberbullying behaviors scale comprised sharing images, gossip, and personal attack. Both scales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency and convergent validity.


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