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dc.contributor.authorDainty, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorHoltham, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Philip
dc.contributor.authorTimmons, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorFox, Mark
dc.contributor.authorCallaghan, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-12T16:13:17Z
dc.date.available2018-01-12T16:13:17Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-16
dc.identifier.citationDainty, A. D. et al (2017) 'The feasibility of nurse-delivered, low-intensity cognitive behavioural therapy for irritable bowel syndrome', Gastrointestinal Nursing, 15 (9):39.en
dc.identifier.issn14795248
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/gasn.2017.15.9.39
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622056
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: This study assessed the feasibility of nurse-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods and analysis: A mixed-method design was used, and 20 participants were randomly allocated to high-intensity CBT (n=5), guided self-help (n=5), self-help only (n=5) or treatment as usual (n=5). Ten intervention participants completed semi-structured interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics; qualitative data were analysed using group thematic analysis. Results: Barriers to the interventions were lack of therapist contact, negative preconceptions about treatment and factors relating to supporting materials. Treatment facilitators included therapist-facilitated relaxation, narratives located within self-help materials and social support mechanisms. Conclusion: Further development of the low-intensity interventions in collaboration with service users is required to improve intervention acceptability and relevance.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/gasn.2017.15.9.39en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Gastrointestinal Nursingen
dc.subjectControlled trialsen
dc.subjectCognitive behaviour therapyen
dc.subjectFunctional gastrointestinal diseaseen
dc.subjectIrritable bowel syndromeen
dc.subjectNurse-led interventionsen
dc.subjectNurse-patient relationshipsen
dc.titleThe feasibility of nurse-delivered, low-intensity cognitive behavioural therapy for irritable bowel syndrome.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn20522835
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Pennsylvaniaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen
dc.contributor.departmentSt. Claraspitalen
dc.identifier.journalGastrointestinal Nursingen
dc.contributor.institutionLecturer in Nursing and Health Care Practice, University of Derby
dc.contributor.institutionAssociate Director of Clinical Training in Psychology, University of Pennsylvania
dc.contributor.institutionClinical Data Manager, University of Nottingham
dc.contributor.institutionLecturer in CBT, University of Nottingham
dc.contributor.institutionProfessor, University of Nottingham
dc.contributor.institutionProfessor of Gastroenterology, St. Claraspital, Basel, Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionProfessor of Mental Health Nursing, University of Nottingham
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-16T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractIntroduction: This study assessed the feasibility of nurse-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods and analysis: A mixed-method design was used, and 20 participants were randomly allocated to high-intensity CBT (n=5), guided self-help (n=5), self-help only (n=5) or treatment as usual (n=5). Ten intervention participants completed semi-structured interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics; qualitative data were analysed using group thematic analysis. Results: Barriers to the interventions were lack of therapist contact, negative preconceptions about treatment and factors relating to supporting materials. Treatment facilitators included therapist-facilitated relaxation, narratives located within self-help materials and social support mechanisms. Conclusion: Further development of the low-intensity interventions in collaboration with service users is required to improve intervention acceptability and relevance.


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