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dc.contributor.authorKotera, Yasuhiroen
dc.contributor.authorAdhikari, Prateeken
dc.contributor.authorVan Gordon, Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-20T16:32:40Z
dc.date.available2017-12-20T16:32:40Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-02
dc.identifier.citationKotera, Y. et al (2017) 'Relationship between types of work motivation and worker profile in UK hospitality workers.', in Proceedings of the International Conference on Social Sciences, Humanities and Technology (ICSHT 2017), Hotel Perdana, Kota Bharu Kelantan, Malaysia, 2-3 December.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622031
dc.description.abstractObjectives The UK hospitality industry employs more than two million workers and accounts for 7% of the country’s workforce. However, despite the number of people employed, work-related mental health issues are a cause for concern in this worker population. While our previous research in UK hospitality workers identified that work motivation was a predictor of mental health, the relationship between types of work motivation and worker profile (e.g. demography, work experience, position) has not been explored to date. This study aimed to i) identify the primary type of work motivation, and ii) explore relationships between worker profile and types of work motivation in UK hospitality workers. Methodology 103 UK hospitality workers completed a worker profile questionnaire and work motivation measure. Descriptive statistics were yielded to compare each type of motivation, and correlation analyses were conducted between worker profile and motivation type. Findings Levels of internal motivation were found to be significantly higher than external motivation. Male and longer time served in the industry were associated with amotivation, the lowest form of external motivation. A higher position in the organisation was associated with external regulation, the second lowest form of external motivation. Future research Research evaluating the effectiveness of interventions to enhance intrinsic motivation, particularly among male experienced workers or managers/owners is warranted. Furthermore, male hospitality workers’ high levels of external motivation may highlight the UK’s strong masculine culture as described in Hofstede’s cultural dimension theory. This echoes with our previous research finding that shame concerning mental health issues is a problem among UK hospitality workers. Cross-cultural comparisons of work motivation and mental health would be an important future direction to help place these findings in a global context.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGlobal Academic Excellenceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.egax.org/en
dc.relation.urlhttps://submit.confbay.com/conf/icsht2017
dc.subjectInternal motivationen
dc.subjectExternal motivationen
dc.subjectUK hospitality workersen
dc.subjectWorker profileen
dc.titleRelationship between types of work motivation and worker profile in UK hospitality workers.en
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:24:19Z
html.description.abstractObjectives The UK hospitality industry employs more than two million workers and accounts for 7% of the country’s workforce. However, despite the number of people employed, work-related mental health issues are a cause for concern in this worker population. While our previous research in UK hospitality workers identified that work motivation was a predictor of mental health, the relationship between types of work motivation and worker profile (e.g. demography, work experience, position) has not been explored to date. This study aimed to i) identify the primary type of work motivation, and ii) explore relationships between worker profile and types of work motivation in UK hospitality workers. Methodology 103 UK hospitality workers completed a worker profile questionnaire and work motivation measure. Descriptive statistics were yielded to compare each type of motivation, and correlation analyses were conducted between worker profile and motivation type. Findings Levels of internal motivation were found to be significantly higher than external motivation. Male and longer time served in the industry were associated with amotivation, the lowest form of external motivation. A higher position in the organisation was associated with external regulation, the second lowest form of external motivation. Future research Research evaluating the effectiveness of interventions to enhance intrinsic motivation, particularly among male experienced workers or managers/owners is warranted. Furthermore, male hospitality workers’ high levels of external motivation may highlight the UK’s strong masculine culture as described in Hofstede’s cultural dimension theory. This echoes with our previous research finding that shame concerning mental health issues is a problem among UK hospitality workers. Cross-cultural comparisons of work motivation and mental health would be an important future direction to help place these findings in a global context.


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