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dc.contributor.authorHarling, Martyn
dc.contributor.authorGoddard, Zuzia
dc.contributor.authorHigson, Rob
dc.contributor.authorHumphrey, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T12:44:27Z
dc.date.available2017-11-27T12:44:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-18
dc.identifier.citationHarling, M. et al (2017) 'Addressing negative attitudes, developing knowledge: the design and evaluation of a bespoke substance misuse module.' Research, Policy and Planning, 32(3), 137-149.en
dc.identifier.issn0264-519X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621982
dc.description.abstractRecent calls for the inclusion of substance misuse into social work curricula appear to have been met with a piecemeal and rather sporadic approach from many Higher Education establishments. The research described in this article set out to determine if a bespoke module, delivered to a group of social work students (n=57), might influence their attitudes and values towards substance misuse and working with substance misusers. A mixed methods approach was used, employing an attitudinal Likert scale and a series of semi-structured interviews (n=10). Analysis of the quantitative data indicated that there was no significant change in the students’ established attitudes over the course of the module, but there was a substantial increase in the number of students (35%) who agreed with the Likert statement ‘working with drug users is a rewarding role’. The qualitative element of the research suggested that students felt more prepared for working with substance misusers and had increased their level of substance misuse knowledge since starting training. Whilst it is prudent to remain cautious when reporting the findings of a small scale research study, the results of the study support the effectiveness of the bespoke module in preparing the students to work with substance users/misusers.
dc.description.sponsorshipUndergraduate research scholarship scheme from the University of Derbyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSocial Services Research Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ssrg.org.uk/members/files/2016/10/1.-Harling-et-al.pdfen
dc.subjectSocial work studentsen
dc.subjectSubstance use/misuseen
dc.subjectAttitudes and valuesen
dc.subjectLearning technologyen
dc.titleAddressing negative attitudes, developing knowledge: the design and evaluation of a bespoke substance misuse module.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentDerby City Councilen
dc.identifier.journalResearch, Policy and Planningen
refterms.dateFOA2018-02-27T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractRecent calls for the inclusion of substance misuse into social work curricula appear to have been met with a piecemeal and rather sporadic approach from many Higher Education establishments. The research described in this article set out to determine if a bespoke module, delivered to a group of social work students (n=57), might influence their attitudes and values towards substance misuse and working with substance misusers. A mixed methods approach was used, employing an attitudinal Likert scale and a series of semi-structured interviews (n=10). Analysis of the quantitative data indicated that there was no significant change in the students’ established attitudes over the course of the module, but there was a substantial increase in the number of students (35%) who agreed with the Likert statement ‘working with drug users is a rewarding role’. The qualitative element of the research suggested that students felt more prepared for working with substance misusers and had increased their level of substance misuse knowledge since starting training. Whilst it is prudent to remain cautious when reporting the findings of a small scale research study, the results of the study support the effectiveness of the bespoke module in preparing the students to work with substance users/misusers.


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