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dc.contributor.authorFryer, Simon
dc.contributor.authorStone, Keeron
dc.contributor.authorSveen, Joakim
dc.contributor.authorDickson, Tabitha
dc.contributor.authorEspaña-Romero, Vanesa
dc.contributor.authorGiles, David
dc.contributor.authorBaláš, Jiří
dc.contributor.authorStoner, Lee
dc.contributor.authorDraper, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-25T15:30:17Z
dc.date.available2017-10-25T15:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-28
dc.identifier.citationFryer, S. et al (2017) 'Differences in forearm strength, endurance, and hemodynamic kinetics between male boulderers and lead rock climbers', European Journal of Sport Science, 17 (9):1177en
dc.identifier.issn17461391
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17461391.2017.1353135
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621905
dc.description.abstractThis study examined differences in the oxygenation kinetics and strength and endurance characteristics of boulderers and lead sport climbers. Using near infrared spectroscopy, 13-boulderers, 10-lead climbers, and 10-controls completed assessments of oxidative capacity index and muscle oxygen consumption (mV̇O2) in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), and extensor digitorum communis (EDC). Additionally, forearm strength (maximal volitional contraction MVC), endurance (force–time integral FTI at 40% MVC), and forearm volume (FAV and ΔFAV) was assessed. MVC was significantly greater in boulderers compared to lead climbers (mean difference = 9.6, 95% CI 5.2–14 kg). FDP and EDC oxidative capacity indexes were significantly greater (p = .041 and .013, respectively) in lead climbers and boulderers compared to controls (mean difference = −1.166, 95% CI (−3.264 to 0.931 s) and mean difference = −1.120, 95% CI (−3.316 to 1.075 s), respectively) with no differences between climbing disciplines. Climbers had a significantly greater FTI compared to controls (mean difference = 2205, 95% CI= 1114–3296 and mean difference = 1716, 95% CI = 553–2880, respectively) but not between disciplines. There were no significant group differences in ΔFAV or mV̇O2. The greater MVC in boulderers may be due to neural adaptation and not hypertrophy. A greater oxidative capacity index in both climbing groups suggests that irrespective of climbing discipline, trainers, coaches, and practitioners should consider forearm specific aerobic training to aid performance.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17461391.2017.1353135en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European Journal of Sport Scienceen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectOxidative capacityen
dc.subjectMicrovascular adaptationen
dc.subjectNear infrared spectroscopyen
dc.subjectBlood flowen
dc.subjectPerfusionen
dc.subjectSport climbingen
dc.subjectRock climbingen
dc.subjectBoulderingen
dc.titleDifferences in forearm strength, endurance, and hemodynamic kinetics between male boulderers and lead rock climbersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn15367290
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Gloucestershireen
dc.contributor.departmentEdinburgh Napier Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Cadizen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentCharles Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Carolinaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Canterburyen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Sport Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Sport and Exercise, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Gloucester, UK
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Sport and Exercise, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Gloucester, UK
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life, Sport and Social Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Sport and Exercise, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Gloucester, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physical Education, School of Education, University of Cadiz, Cadiz, Spain
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Life Sciences, College of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Derby, Buxton, UK
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sport and Exercise, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health Sciences, College of Education, Health and Human Development, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-06-30
refterms.dateFOA2019-01-28T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThis study examined differences in the oxygenation kinetics and strength and endurance characteristics of boulderers and lead sport climbers. Using near infrared spectroscopy, 13-boulderers, 10-lead climbers, and 10-controls completed assessments of oxidative capacity index and muscle oxygen consumption (mV̇O2) in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), and extensor digitorum communis (EDC). Additionally, forearm strength (maximal volitional contraction MVC), endurance (force–time integral FTI at 40% MVC), and forearm volume (FAV and ΔFAV) was assessed. MVC was significantly greater in boulderers compared to lead climbers (mean difference = 9.6, 95% CI 5.2–14 kg). FDP and EDC oxidative capacity indexes were significantly greater (p = .041 and .013, respectively) in lead climbers and boulderers compared to controls (mean difference = −1.166, 95% CI (−3.264 to 0.931 s) and mean difference = −1.120, 95% CI (−3.316 to 1.075 s), respectively) with no differences between climbing disciplines. Climbers had a significantly greater FTI compared to controls (mean difference = 2205, 95% CI= 1114–3296 and mean difference = 1716, 95% CI = 553–2880, respectively) but not between disciplines. There were no significant group differences in ΔFAV or mV̇O2. The greater MVC in boulderers may be due to neural adaptation and not hypertrophy. A greater oxidative capacity index in both climbing groups suggests that irrespective of climbing discipline, trainers, coaches, and practitioners should consider forearm specific aerobic training to aid performance.


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