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dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Adam
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Zaheer
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T14:05:37Z
dc.date.available2017-09-22T14:05:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-15
dc.identifier.citationO'Sullivan, A. and Hussain, Z. (2017) 'An Exploratory Study of Facebook Intensity and its Links to Narcissism, Stress, and Self-esteem', Journal of Addictive Behaviors,Therapy & Rehabilitation, 06 (01).en
dc.identifier.issn23249005
dc.identifier.doi10.4172/2324-9005.1000161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621865
dc.description.abstractFacebook use has become a popular social activity. More intensive use of Facebook may increase the risk of health problems. Research suggests that high levels of stress and low levels of self-esteem are linked to Facebook intensity usage, however, these findings have been inconsistent, as studies also suggest the opposite or no links at all. This exploratory study examined whether narcissism, stress and self-esteem could predict Facebook intensity, and whether a short session on Facebook could produce immediate psychological effects. A sample of 163 Facebook users completed an online survey, engaged in a short Facebook session and then completed another online survey. Regression analysis revealed that narcissism, stress and self-esteem were found to significantly predict Facebook intensity with stress being a significant predictor within the model. Facebook use significantly increased self-esteem scores amongst the participants. The findings are discussed in relation to previous research and theory.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSciTechnolen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.scitechnol.com/peer-review/an-exploratory-study-of-facebook-intensity-and-its-links-to-narcissism-stress-and-selfesteem-ijpg.php?article_id=5871en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Addictive Behaviors,Therapy & Rehabilitationen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectFacebooken
dc.subjectSocial networking sitesen
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectSelf-esteemen
dc.titleAn exploratory study of Facebook intensity and its links to narcissism, stress, and self-esteemen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitationen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T16:07:08Z
html.description.abstractFacebook use has become a popular social activity. More intensive use of Facebook may increase the risk of health problems. Research suggests that high levels of stress and low levels of self-esteem are linked to Facebook intensity usage, however, these findings have been inconsistent, as studies also suggest the opposite or no links at all. This exploratory study examined whether narcissism, stress and self-esteem could predict Facebook intensity, and whether a short session on Facebook could produce immediate psychological effects. A sample of 163 Facebook users completed an online survey, engaged in a short Facebook session and then completed another online survey. Regression analysis revealed that narcissism, stress and self-esteem were found to significantly predict Facebook intensity with stress being a significant predictor within the model. Facebook use significantly increased self-esteem scores amongst the participants. The findings are discussed in relation to previous research and theory.


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