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dc.contributor.authorMatos, Marcela
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Cristiana
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Joana
dc.contributor.authorPinto-Gouveia, José
dc.contributor.authorPetrocchi, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorBasran, Jaskaran
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-08T11:24:09Z
dc.date.available2017-09-08T11:24:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-08
dc.identifier.citationMatos, M. et al (2017) 'Psychological and Physiological Effects of Compassionate Mind Training: a Pilot Randomised Controlled Study', Mindfulness, DOI: 10.1007/s12671-017-0745-7en
dc.identifier.issn18688527
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12671-017-0745-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621841
dc.description.abstractThe development of the compassionate self, associated with practices such as slow and deeper breathing, compassionate voice tones and facial expressions and compassionate focusing is central to Compassion Focused Therapy. This study explores the impact of a two-week Compassionate Mind Training (CMT) program on emotional, self-evaluative and psychopathology measures and on heart rate variability (HRV). Participants (general population and college students) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: CMT (n=56) and Wait-List Control (n=37). Participants in the CMTcondition were instructed to practice CMT exercises during two weeks. Self-report measures of compassion, positive affect, fears of compassion, self-criticism, shame, depression, anxiety and stress, and HRV were collected at pre and post intervention in both conditions. Compared to the control group, the experimental group showed significant increases in positive emotions, associated with feeling relaxed and also safe and content, but not activated; and in self-compassion, compassion for others and compassion from others. There were significant reductions in shame, self-criticism, fears of compassion, and stress. Only the experimental group reported significant improvement in HRV. Developing awareness of the evolved nature and inherent difficulties of our minds allied with practicing CMT exercises has beneficial effects on participants' psychological and physiological well-being.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12671-017-0745-7en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Mindfulnessen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.subjectCompassionate mind trainingen
dc.subjectPhysiological effectsen
dc.subjectFacial expressionen
dc.subjectPositivityen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectInterventionen
dc.subjectPsychopathologyen
dc.subjectSelf-criticismen
dc.subjectHeart rate variabilityen
dc.titlePsychological and physiological effects of compassionate mind training: A pilot randomised controlled studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn18688535
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Coimbraen
dc.contributor.departmentJohn Cabot Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalMindfulnessen
dc.date.accepted2017-05-05
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-08T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThe development of the compassionate self, associated with practices such as slow and deeper breathing, compassionate voice tones and facial expressions and compassionate focusing is central to Compassion Focused Therapy. This study explores the impact of a two-week Compassionate Mind Training (CMT) program on emotional, self-evaluative and psychopathology measures and on heart rate variability (HRV). Participants (general population and college students) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: CMT (n=56) and Wait-List Control (n=37). Participants in the CMTcondition were instructed to practice CMT exercises during two weeks. Self-report measures of compassion, positive affect, fears of compassion, self-criticism, shame, depression, anxiety and stress, and HRV were collected at pre and post intervention in both conditions. Compared to the control group, the experimental group showed significant increases in positive emotions, associated with feeling relaxed and also safe and content, but not activated; and in self-compassion, compassion for others and compassion from others. There were significant reductions in shame, self-criticism, fears of compassion, and stress. Only the experimental group reported significant improvement in HRV. Developing awareness of the evolved nature and inherent difficulties of our minds allied with practicing CMT exercises has beneficial effects on participants' psychological and physiological well-being.


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