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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Andrew L. A.
dc.contributor.authorValentine, Annemarie
dc.contributor.authorLeng, Melanie J.
dc.contributor.authorSloane, Hilary J.
dc.contributor.authorSchoene, Bernd
dc.contributor.authorSurge, Donna
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-03T15:13:50Z
dc.date.available2017-08-03T15:13:50Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-29
dc.identifier.citationJohnson ALA, Valentine A, Leng MJ, Sloane HJ, Schöne BR & Surge D (2017) 'Anti-predation strategy, growth rate and extinction amongst Pliocene scallops of the US eastern seaboard.' Environmental Sustainability Research Centre Annual Conference (University of Derby, 29 June 2017), Programme and Abstracts, 23.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621802
dc.description.abstractPlacopecten, Chesapecten and Carolinapecten are scallop genera occurring in the Pliocene of the US eastern seaboard. The first (extant) is a smooth, streamlined form, adept at escaping predators by swimming (‘flight’ strategy). The other two (extinct) are plicate forms. Plication facilitates a ‘resistance’ strategy towards predators which is benefited by large size and high shell thickness - maximally so if these states are achieved early in life. Oxygen isotope profiles show that in early ontogeny, Pliocene Placopecten grew at the same moderate rate as modern Placopecten. By contrast, Chesapecten grew as fast as the fastest-growing modern scallop and developed an unusually thick shell, while Carolinapecten grew substantially faster still, this probably enabled by high primary productivity. Extinction of these genera, and survival of Placopecten, can be attributed to a decline in productivity which prevented a maximally effective ‘resistance’ strategy towards predators but had no deleterious impact on a ‘flight’ strategy.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.derby.ac.uk/science/research/centres-groups/environmental/en
dc.subjectExtinctionen
dc.subjectPlioceneen
dc.subjectSclerochronologyen
dc.subjectGrowth rateen
dc.subjectPalaeoproductivityen
dc.subjectPalaeotemperatureen
dc.titleAnti-predation strategy, growth rate and extinction amongst Pliocene scallops of the US eastern seaboarden
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Loughboroughen
dc.contributor.departmentBritish Geological Surveyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Mainzen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hillen
html.description.abstractPlacopecten, Chesapecten and Carolinapecten are scallop genera occurring in the Pliocene of the US eastern seaboard. The first (extant) is a smooth, streamlined form, adept at escaping predators by swimming (‘flight’ strategy). The other two (extinct) are plicate forms. Plication facilitates a ‘resistance’ strategy towards predators which is benefited by large size and high shell thickness - maximally so if these states are achieved early in life. Oxygen isotope profiles show that in early ontogeny, Pliocene Placopecten grew at the same moderate rate as modern Placopecten. By contrast, Chesapecten grew as fast as the fastest-growing modern scallop and developed an unusually thick shell, while Carolinapecten grew substantially faster still, this probably enabled by high primary productivity. Extinction of these genera, and survival of Placopecten, can be attributed to a decline in productivity which prevented a maximally effective ‘resistance’ strategy towards predators but had no deleterious impact on a ‘flight’ strategy.


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