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dc.contributor.authorSleath, Emma
dc.contributor.authorBull, Ray
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-31T09:41:21Z
dc.date.available2017-07-31T09:41:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-24
dc.identifier.citationSleath, E. and Bull, R. (2017) 'Police perceptions of rape victims and the impact on case decision making: A systematic review', Aggression and Violent Behavior, 34:102en
dc.identifier.issn13591789
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.avb.2017.02.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621784
dc.description.abstractPolice officers are frequently perceived to hold negative attitudes about rape victims. The aim of this systematic review is to: (1) synthesise the current literature on police officers' attributions of rape victim blame, assessments of rape victim credibility, and rape myth acceptance; and, (2) examine the evidence that holding these attitudes impacts on police investigative decision making in rape cases. Twenty-four articles published between 2000 and 2016 were included following a systematic search of the available literature. The findings highlight that some police officers do hold problematic attitudes about rape victims e.g., blame, rape myth acceptance, although they are frequently noted to be at a low level. Furthermore, characteristics of the victim, e.g., alcohol intoxication and emotional expression, can affect attributions of victim credibility. Assessments of victim credibility were related to police investigative decision making e.g., recommendations to charge the perpetrator, perceptions of guilt. However, the impact of rape victim blaming and rape myth acceptance is less clear. Given that the literature was predominantly vignette-based, it is unclear how these judgements have an impact in real rape investigations.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S135917891730071Xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Aggression and Violent Behavioren
dc.subjectPoliceen
dc.subjectRapeen
dc.subjectBlameen
dc.subjectCredibilityen
dc.titlePolice perceptions of rape victims and the impact on case decision making: A systematic reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCoventry Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalAggression and Violent Behavioren
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-02-20
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractPolice officers are frequently perceived to hold negative attitudes about rape victims. The aim of this systematic review is to: (1) synthesise the current literature on police officers' attributions of rape victim blame, assessments of rape victim credibility, and rape myth acceptance; and, (2) examine the evidence that holding these attitudes impacts on police investigative decision making in rape cases. Twenty-four articles published between 2000 and 2016 were included following a systematic search of the available literature. The findings highlight that some police officers do hold problematic attitudes about rape victims e.g., blame, rape myth acceptance, although they are frequently noted to be at a low level. Furthermore, characteristics of the victim, e.g., alcohol intoxication and emotional expression, can affect attributions of victim credibility. Assessments of victim credibility were related to police investigative decision making e.g., recommendations to charge the perpetrator, perceptions of guilt. However, the impact of rape victim blaming and rape myth acceptance is less clear. Given that the literature was predominantly vignette-based, it is unclear how these judgements have an impact in real rape investigations.


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