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dc.contributor.authorWaterhouse, Genevieve F.
dc.contributor.authorRidley, Anne M.
dc.contributor.authorBull, Ray
dc.contributor.authorLa Rooy, David
dc.contributor.authorWilcock, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T14:11:56Z
dc.date.available2017-07-20T14:11:56Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-10
dc.identifier.citationWaterhouse, G. F. et al (2016) 'Dynamics of Repeated Interviews with Children', Applied Cognitive Psychology, 30 (5):713en
dc.identifier.issn08884080
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/acp.3246
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621763
dc.description.abstractConcerns regarding repeat interviews with child witnesses include greater use of suggestive questions in later interviews due to bias, and that children may appear inconsistent and, therefore, be judged as less reliable in court. UK transcripts of first and second interviews with 21 child victims/witnesses (conducted by qualified interviewers) were coded for question types and child responses. Interviewers were consistent in their proportional use of question types across interviews. Furthermore, children were as informative in second interviews as in first, mostly providing new details consistent with their prior recall. Despite the apparent lack of training in conducting repeated interviews, no negative effects were found; second interviews appeared to be conducted as well as initial interviews, and children provided new details without many contradictions. It is suggested that when a child's testimony is paramount for an investigation, a well-conducted supplementary interview may be an effective way of gaining further investigative leads.Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3246en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Applied Cognitive Psychologyen
dc.subjectRepeated interviewsen
dc.subjectChild victimsen
dc.subjectInvestigative interviewingen
dc.subjectChild abuseen
dc.titleDynamics of repeated interviews with childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLondon South Bank Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Winchesteren
dc.identifier.journalApplied Cognitive Psychologyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; London South Bank University; London UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; London South Bank University; London UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Criminology and Law; University of Derby; Derby UK
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Law, Royal Holloway; University of London; London UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; University of Winchester; Winchester UK
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:58:14Z
html.description.abstractConcerns regarding repeat interviews with child witnesses include greater use of suggestive questions in later interviews due to bias, and that children may appear inconsistent and, therefore, be judged as less reliable in court. UK transcripts of first and second interviews with 21 child victims/witnesses (conducted by qualified interviewers) were coded for question types and child responses. Interviewers were consistent in their proportional use of question types across interviews. Furthermore, children were as informative in second interviews as in first, mostly providing new details consistent with their prior recall. Despite the apparent lack of training in conducting repeated interviews, no negative effects were found; second interviews appeared to be conducted as well as initial interviews, and children provided new details without many contradictions. It is suggested that when a child's testimony is paramount for an investigation, a well-conducted supplementary interview may be an effective way of gaining further investigative leads.Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


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