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dc.contributor.authorHermanto, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorZuroff, David C.
dc.contributor.authorKopala-Sibley, Daniel C.
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Allison C.
dc.contributor.authorMatos, Marcela
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKoestner, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T16:02:02Z
dc.date.available2017-07-14T16:02:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-29
dc.identifier.citationHermanto, N. et al (2016) 'Ability to receive compassion from others buffers the depressogenic effect of self-criticism: A cross-cultural multi-study analysis', Personality and Individual Differences, 98:324en
dc.identifier.issn01918869
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2016.04.055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621748
dc.description.abstractSelf-criticism has been shown to be a vulnerability factor that can lead to and maintain depression. We examined the moderating effect of fear of receiving compassion from others on the positive association between self-criticism and depression. Self-report measures were administered to four separate samples (total N = 701) varying in age (students and community adults) and cultural context (Canada, England, and Portugal). Two different measures of self-criticism and of depression were administered to investigate the generalizability of results. Self-criticism, depression, and fear of compassion from others were positively related to one another in all samples. As predicted, fear of compassion from others exerted a moderating effect on the relationship between self-criticism and depression. Low fear of compassion from others weakened the depressogenic effect of self-criticism, while high fear of compassion from others exacerbated the effect. Thus, a self-critic's ability to be open and responsive to care and support from others protected against depression. The aggregate moderating effect across the four studies was of medium size (d + = .53) and highly significant, indicating a robust phenomenon. Implications for working with self-critical depressed patients are discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0191886916303154en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Personality and Individual Differencesen
dc.subjectSelf-criticismen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.subjectAttachmenten
dc.titleAbility to receive compassion from others buffers the depressogenic effect of self-criticism: A cross-cultural multi-study analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMcGill Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Waterlooen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Coimbraen
dc.contributor.departmentKingsway Hospitalen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalPersonality and Individual Differencesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-04-14
html.description.abstractSelf-criticism has been shown to be a vulnerability factor that can lead to and maintain depression. We examined the moderating effect of fear of receiving compassion from others on the positive association between self-criticism and depression. Self-report measures were administered to four separate samples (total N = 701) varying in age (students and community adults) and cultural context (Canada, England, and Portugal). Two different measures of self-criticism and of depression were administered to investigate the generalizability of results. Self-criticism, depression, and fear of compassion from others were positively related to one another in all samples. As predicted, fear of compassion from others exerted a moderating effect on the relationship between self-criticism and depression. Low fear of compassion from others weakened the depressogenic effect of self-criticism, while high fear of compassion from others exacerbated the effect. Thus, a self-critic's ability to be open and responsive to care and support from others protected against depression. The aggregate moderating effect across the four studies was of medium size (d + = .53) and highly significant, indicating a robust phenomenon. Implications for working with self-critical depressed patients are discussed.


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