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dc.contributor.authorGale, Corinne
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorRead, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorGoss, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T15:56:54Z
dc.date.available2017-07-14T15:56:54Z
dc.date.issued2012-06-28
dc.identifier.citationGale, C. et al (2014) 'Evaluation of the Impact of Introducing Compassion Focused Therapy to a Standard Treatment Programme for People with Eating Disorders, Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 21 (1):1-12en
dc.identifier.issn10633995
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cpp.1806
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621747
dc.description.abstractObjective This study explored the outcome of introducing Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) into a standard treatment programme for people with eating disorders. In particular, the aim was to evaluate the principle that CFT can be used with people with eating disorders and improve eating disorder symptomatology. Method Routinely collected questionnaire data were used to assess cognitive and behavioural aspects of eating disorders and social functioning/well being (n = 99). Results There were significant improvements on all questionnaire measures during the programme. An analysis by diagnosis found that people with bulimia nervosa improved significantly more than people with anorexia nervosa on most of the subscales. Also, in terms of clinical significance, 73% of those with bulimia nervosa were considered to have made clinically reliable and significant improvements at the end of treatment (compared with 21% of people with anorexia nervosa and 30% of people with atypical eating disorders). Conclusion This study demonstrates the potential benefits of using CFT with people with eating disorders and highlights the need for further research on this new approach. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/cpp.1806en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCompassion focused therapyen
dc.subjectEating disordersen
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.titleAn evaluation of the impact of introducing compassion focused therapy to a standard treatment programme for people with eating disordersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKingsway Hospitalen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentCoventry Eating Disorder Serviceen
dc.identifier.journalClinical Psychology & Psychotherapyen
dc.contributor.institutionMental Health Research Unit; Kingsway Derby UK
dc.contributor.institutionMental Health Research Unit; Kingsway Derby UK
dc.contributor.institutionCoventry Eating Disorders Service; Coventry UK
dc.contributor.institutionCoventry Eating Disorders Service; Coventry UK
html.description.abstractObjective This study explored the outcome of introducing Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) into a standard treatment programme for people with eating disorders. In particular, the aim was to evaluate the principle that CFT can be used with people with eating disorders and improve eating disorder symptomatology. Method Routinely collected questionnaire data were used to assess cognitive and behavioural aspects of eating disorders and social functioning/well being (n = 99). Results There were significant improvements on all questionnaire measures during the programme. An analysis by diagnosis found that people with bulimia nervosa improved significantly more than people with anorexia nervosa on most of the subscales. Also, in terms of clinical significance, 73% of those with bulimia nervosa were considered to have made clinically reliable and significant improvements at the end of treatment (compared with 21% of people with anorexia nervosa and 30% of people with atypical eating disorders). Conclusion This study demonstrates the potential benefits of using CFT with people with eating disorders and highlights the need for further research on this new approach. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


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