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dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Martin C.
dc.contributor.authorNicolle, Colette
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Russell
dc.contributor.authorSims, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorLawton, Clare
dc.contributor.authorPeace, Sheila
dc.contributor.authorPercival, John
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-29T11:30:10Z
dc.date.available2017-06-29T11:30:10Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationMAGUIRE, M. ... et al, 2011. Age friendly kitchens: a study based on social history and ergonomics. IN: Include 2011 Proceedings. 6th International Conference on Inclusive Design: The Role of Inclusive Design in Making Social Innovation Happen. Royal College of Art, London, UK, 18th-20th April.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781910000000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621675
dc.description.abstractThe kitchen is an important space in the home serving many purposes both functional and social. The need was identified to chart social changes experienced by older people in relation to the kitchen and to understand current issues and problems of kitchen usage. Two interviews were conducted with 40 older participants (aged between 61 and 91) living in a variety of British housing types in Loughborough and Bristol. The first interview recorded their experience of the kitchen throughout their lives, and the second on the contemporary kitchen and how well it meets their needs. This paper focuses on the second interview. It was found that problems of reaching, bending and stretching, dexterity and sight were all relatively common while for specific tasks, problems with ironing, cleaning and shopping were the most frequent. Categorisation of participants’ likes and dislikes about their kitchens were recorded highlighting the most important issues for the participants. The paper reports on coping strategies used by older people in their kitchens which help to promote inclusive design social inclusion throughout the life course.
dc.publisherHelen Hamlyn Research Centre (Royal College of Art)en
dc.relation.urlhttps://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/8164en
dc.titleAge friendly kitchens: a study based on social history and ergonomicsen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentLoughborough Universityen
html.description.abstractThe kitchen is an important space in the home serving many purposes both functional and social. The need was identified to chart social changes experienced by older people in relation to the kitchen and to understand current issues and problems of kitchen usage. Two interviews were conducted with 40 older participants (aged between 61 and 91) living in a variety of British housing types in Loughborough and Bristol. The first interview recorded their experience of the kitchen throughout their lives, and the second on the contemporary kitchen and how well it meets their needs. This paper focuses on the second interview. It was found that problems of reaching, bending and stretching, dexterity and sight were all relatively common while for specific tasks, problems with ironing, cleaning and shopping were the most frequent. Categorisation of participants’ likes and dislikes about their kitchens were recorded highlighting the most important issues for the participants. The paper reports on coping strategies used by older people in their kitchens which help to promote inclusive design social inclusion throughout the life course.


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