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dc.contributor.authorRoscoe, Clare M. P.
dc.contributor.authorJames, Rob S.
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Michael J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T14:31:07Z
dc.date.available2017-06-21T14:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-03
dc.identifier.citationRoscoe, C. M. P. (2017) 'Preschool staff and parents? Perceptions of preschool children's physical activity and fundamental movement skills from an area of high deprivation: a qualitative study', Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, DOI: 10.1080/2159676X.2017.1322630en
dc.identifier.issn2159676X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/2159676X.2017.1322630
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621657
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated preschool staff and parents’ perceptions of preschool children’s physical activity (PA) and fundamental movement skills (FMS), in relation to the environment, facilities, play and barriers to PA. Following institutional ethics approval, semi-structured focus groups were conducted in four preschools, with the inclusion of parents and staff of 2–4-year-old children from North Warwickshire, England. The focus groups consisted of between four and five participants and included both parents and staff. However, focus groups were homogeneous in terms of gender, socio-economic background and predominately homogeneous in ethnic background. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes and subthemes. Emergent themes included: spacious outdoor environment, the use of climbing frames and outdoor equipment for promoting PA and developing FMS, who was responsible for PA; time, cost, health and safety concerns as barriers to PA and staff training. Findings suggest that preschools provide good opportunities for PA and FMS, especially for preschool children from low socio-economic backgrounds, allowing them access to outdoor exercise and equipment. However, results from the focus groups highlighted a need for more staff training and greater parental involvement in relation to PA and FMS opportunities, to further improve preschool children’s PA levels and develop their FMS. To increase PA and FMS in preschool children, interventions are required which continue with the current levels of PA in preschools, whilst including greater parental involvement and staff training for increasing PA levels and developing FMS.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2159676X.2017.1322630en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Healthen
dc.subjectFundamental movement skillsen
dc.subjectLow socio-economic backgrounden
dc.subjectPhysical activityen
dc.subjectPreschool childrenen
dc.subjectThematic analysisen
dc.titlePreschool staff and parents? Perceptions of preschool children's physical activity and fundamental movement skills from an area of high deprivation: a qualitative studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn21596778
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentCoventry Universityen
dc.identifier.journalQualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Healthen
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-04-13
refterms.dateFOA2018-11-03T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThis study investigated preschool staff and parents’ perceptions of preschool children’s physical activity (PA) and fundamental movement skills (FMS), in relation to the environment, facilities, play and barriers to PA. Following institutional ethics approval, semi-structured focus groups were conducted in four preschools, with the inclusion of parents and staff of 2–4-year-old children from North Warwickshire, England. The focus groups consisted of between four and five participants and included both parents and staff. However, focus groups were homogeneous in terms of gender, socio-economic background and predominately homogeneous in ethnic background. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes and subthemes. Emergent themes included: spacious outdoor environment, the use of climbing frames and outdoor equipment for promoting PA and developing FMS, who was responsible for PA; time, cost, health and safety concerns as barriers to PA and staff training. Findings suggest that preschools provide good opportunities for PA and FMS, especially for preschool children from low socio-economic backgrounds, allowing them access to outdoor exercise and equipment. However, results from the focus groups highlighted a need for more staff training and greater parental involvement in relation to PA and FMS opportunities, to further improve preschool children’s PA levels and develop their FMS. To increase PA and FMS in preschool children, interventions are required which continue with the current levels of PA in preschools, whilst including greater parental involvement and staff training for increasing PA levels and developing FMS.


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