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dc.contributor.authorTakhar, Sukhraj
dc.contributor.authorLiyanage, Kapila
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T14:03:39Z
dc.date.available2017-06-21T14:03:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.citationTakhar, S. and Liyanage, K. (2017) 'A chemical substance reporting system for manufacturing companies', 15th International Conference on Manufacturing Research ICMR, University of Greenwich, UK, 5-7 September.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621656
dc.description.abstractWhile striving to mitigate the risk to human health and the environment, chemical substance regulations continue to impose greater legislative burdens on industry, which ultimately creates business continuity risk. Compliance to these regulations requires greater investment which ultimately undermines profits. Furthermore, as regulations vary between countries or politico-economic unions, impact on manufacturers is dependent on which areas of the world that its supply chain is most prevalent. A chemical substance reporting system for manufacturing companies requires information on parts and manufacturing processes that are both defined in-house and within the external supply chain. Without information on chemical substance uses within the downstream supply chain, manufacturers cannot fulfil their legislative obligations or effectively manage business continuity risk. Often the biggest hurdle to collecting this information is supply chain engagement, which is made more difficult with multiple, different industry standards and data exchange formats. As more and more chemical substances become heavily regulated, manufacturers require increased volumes of downstream supply chain information on a routine basis. The aim of this paper is to identify existing good practices which could be utilized to implement chemical substance reporting systems for manufacturing companies.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.icmr.org.uk/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.icmr.org.uk/files/ICMR2017-brochure-22%20May.pdfen
dc.subjectChemical regulationsen
dc.subjectSupply chain engagementen
dc.subjectBusiness continuity risken
dc.titleA chemical substance reporting system for manufacturing companiesen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:51:54Z
html.description.abstractWhile striving to mitigate the risk to human health and the environment, chemical substance regulations continue to impose greater legislative burdens on industry, which ultimately creates business continuity risk. Compliance to these regulations requires greater investment which ultimately undermines profits. Furthermore, as regulations vary between countries or politico-economic unions, impact on manufacturers is dependent on which areas of the world that its supply chain is most prevalent. A chemical substance reporting system for manufacturing companies requires information on parts and manufacturing processes that are both defined in-house and within the external supply chain. Without information on chemical substance uses within the downstream supply chain, manufacturers cannot fulfil their legislative obligations or effectively manage business continuity risk. Often the biggest hurdle to collecting this information is supply chain engagement, which is made more difficult with multiple, different industry standards and data exchange formats. As more and more chemical substances become heavily regulated, manufacturers require increased volumes of downstream supply chain information on a routine basis. The aim of this paper is to identify existing good practices which could be utilized to implement chemical substance reporting systems for manufacturing companies.


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